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─═ Renegade v98-101b Documentation ═- Table of Contents: Chapter Definition ───────── ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Foreword Upgrading, Version Numbers, and what is Renegade anyway? What is Renegade? A Note on Version Numbers Upgrading from 5-11 Exp 1 Installation, Startup, and the WFC Screen 1-A System Requirements 1-B Installing Renegade v98-101b 1-C System Startup and Commandline Parameters 1-D WFC Screen Information 1-E WFC Screen Commands 2 SysOp Function Keys 3 ACS System 4 Special Files 4-A The BBS List 4-B The Last Callers List 4-C The Who's On Listing 4-D The User Listing 4-E The Trashcan File 4-F The NEWLET.ASC File 4-G The Global Menu 4-H The READP, FILEP, and NEWINFO Menus 5 Changing Colors 6 System Configuration 6-A Main BBS Configuration 6-B Modem Configuration 6-C System ACS Settings 6-D System Variables 6-E System Toggles 6-F File Section Configuration 6-G Subscription/Validation Levels 6-H Network Configuration 6-H-1 Address Setup 6-I Offline Mail Configuration 6-J String Configuration 6-J-1 Page 1 6-J-2 Page 2 6-J-3 Page 3 6-J-4 Page 4 6-J-5 Page 5 6-J-6 Page 6 6-K Color Configuration 6-K-1 System Colors 6-K-2 File Listings 6-K-3 Message Listings 6-K-4 File Area Listings 6-K-5 Message Area Listings 6-K-6 Offline Mail screen 6-K-7 Private Mail Listing 6-L Archive Configuration 6-M Credit Configuration 6-N Time Limitations 6-O Call Allowances Per Day 6-P UL/DL Number of Files Ratio 6-Q UL/DL Kilobytes Ratio 6-R Post/Call Ratio 6-S Max D/L Per Day 6-T Max D/L K Per Day 6-U Update System Averages 7 User Editor 8 File Base Editor 8-A Configuring CD-ROM File Areas 9 Message Base Editor 10 Protocol Editor 11 Menu Editor 11-A Menu Command Modification 11-B Menu Information Modification 11-C Linking Menu Commands 11-D Menu System Commands (Command Keys) 11-D-1 Offline Mail 11-D-2 Time Bank 11-D-3 SysOp Commands 11-D-4 Miscellaneous 11-D-5 Archive 11-D-6 Batch 11-D-7 Doors 11-D-8 Files 11-D-9 Hangup 11-D-10 Messages 11-D-11 Multi-Node 11-D-12 Other 11-D-13 Auto-Message 11-D-14 Voting 11-D-15 Debt/Credit 11-D-16 File Scanning (FILEP.MNU) 11-D-17 Message Scanning (READP.MNU) 12 Event Editor 13 Voting Editor 14 Conference Editor 15 Mini-DOS Environment 16 Infoform Questionnaire System 16-A How they're made 16-B New User Questionnaire 16-C Questionnaire Commands 17 Run-Time Errors 17-A Default Renegade Errorlevels 17-B DOS Errorlevels 17-C I/O Errorlevels 17-D Critical Errorlevels 17-E Fatal Errorlevels 18 Optional Files 19 Order of Logons 19-A Order of Normal Logon 19-B Order of New User Logon 20 Teleconference 20-A Teleconferencing Commands 20-B Teleconferencing Action File 20-C External Programs through Teleconference 21 Common Modem Initialization Strings 22 Conference System 23 Seting up Doors 24 Renegade Under OS/2 Warp 3 or 4 25 Renegade Under Windows95 26 Renegade Support 27 Dedicated to Craig Glossary of Terms Credits ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Foreword - Upgrading, Version Numbers, and what is Renegade anyway? ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ───────────────── What is Renegade? ───────────────── Renegade BBS is a bulletin board software derived from the Telegard BBS v2.5g source code. Telegard is in turn a modified version of the WWIV pascal source code. Renegade, however has been vastly improved from the original TG 2.5g source. Changes can be browsed from a file known as WHATDONE which list the hundreds of changes made to the original code. Renegade offers SysOps the ultimate in BBS configuration, allowing your BBS to achieve a UNIQUE look and feel. Renegade was originally written by Cott Lang. It is currently authored by Patrick Spence and Gary Hall. Renegade is a Beta test BBS software. In the past, there were clamors for registration, but there is no way to register the software per se. The authors ask that you donate $25 for the use of the software. In return, you are provided with an account on either of their boards and direct support. Renegade uses the SPAWNO routines by Ralf Brown to minimize memory use while shelling to DOS and running other programs. ───────────────────────── A Note On Version Numbers ───────────────────────── Some of you are probably noticing the change in Renegade's version numbers. 5-11-96 Exp was the last release using the date for the version. After 5-11 Exp, Patrick Spence took over production of Renegade and changed the version numbers to the following format: vyr-day.b os yr - Year in which this version was released day - The Julian Date the version was released b - Either b or a, depending on type. Indicates Beta copy or Alpha copy, respectively os - Native Operating system For example, v96-300b dos would be taken to mean that it was released as a Native DOS Beta copy on the 300th day of 1996. The reason for the change in the numbering system is a practical one. With this method of numbering, there will be no question as to when a version was released, and whether or not it is newer or older than another version. ─────────────────────── Upgrading from 5-11 Exp ─────────────────────── One of the changes Patrick Spence made when he took over Renegade production was to consolidate the updates into one archive. Previously, upgrades were done by getting the upgrade package, copying over the RENEGADE.EXE and RENEGADE.OVR files, and then making any changes outlined in the WHATSNEW file. However, now things have gotten extremely easy. :) Upgrading is as simple as unzipping the distribution into a temporary directory and running UPGRADE.EXE, this will extract and implement the necessary files for the upgrade. Going from 5-11 Exp to 98-xxx will involve some work. The Who's On List, Last Callers list, User List, and BBS List are now configurable. The MCI codes to use in these files are detailed in the WHATSNEW.XXX as well as in Chapter 4. Also, the way Renegade pads MCI codes has changed, so you'll want to recheck all your files to make sure everything looks the way you want it to with the new padding scheme. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 1 - Installation, Startup, and the WFC Screen ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ──────────────────────────────── Chapter 1─A: System Requirements ──────────────────────────────── Required: 80286 Processor, 285K Available Conventional Memory, Fossil Driver Recommended Minimum: 80386DX/25 Processor, 570K Available Conventional Memory, 1024K Available EMS Memory ────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 1─B: Installing Renegade v98-101b ────────────────────────────────────────── Unzip the distribution archive into a temporary directory, and run INSTALL.EXE. Answer the questions as you're prompted. That's it. :) ────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 1─C: System Startup and Commandline Parameters ────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Renegade is started by changing to the main Renegade directory, and typing 'RENEGADE'. If you do not have a fossil driver installed, you will receive a message to that effect. If you wish to load Renegade without a fossil driver, you must do so in Local mode, using the -L parameter, detailed below. Renegade accepts the following Commandline Parameters: ─Bnnnnn This command tells the BBS that a user is already connected at nnnnn baud. When loading Renegade with this parameter, the WFC screen will be skipped and the user will be dropped directly into the logon sequence. ─EEnnn If a critical error occurs during the operation of the BBS, it aborts to DOS with an ERRORLEVEL value of nnn. ─ENnnn Whenever a user logs off, and the -Q parameter is specified on the commandline, Renegade returns an errorlevel of 0 if no new echomail was entered, and an errorlevel of 2 if new echomail was entered. This commandline changes the errorlevel Renegade will exit with to nnn. NOTE: When pressing Q from the WFC screen, Renegade will exit with an errorlevel of 255, regardless of whether or not this parameter is used. ─Ixxx If you wish to pass Called ID information to Renegade, use this parameter. This is most likely to be used in conjunction with a Front-End Mailer that supports Caller ID. ─Kxx This changes the screen display mode to 25, 43, and 50 lines respectively. ie, -K25 will change Renegade to 25 line mode (the default), -K43 will change Renegade to 43 line mode, and so on. ─L This tells Renegade to load itself in local mode. While in local mode, Renegade will ignore the modem entirely (it won't send anything out to the modem, and won't respond to incoming calls) ─Mn Will create a QWK mail packet for user n then return to DOS. ─Nn Specifies which node to load (ie, -N1 loads Node 1, -N2 loads Node2, etc.). *Make Certain* that you've turned multinode support on in the Main System Configuration before you implement this parameter on your commandline. ─P Pack the message bases and return to DOS. ─S Sort the File areas and return to DOS. ─Q Quit to DOS instead of the WFC screen upon logoff. ─Un Will upload a REP mail packet for user n then return to DOS. ─Xnnnn External event start time in nnnn minutes. Renegade will treat this as a built in hard event and log the user off in nnnn minutes. ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 1─D: WFC Screen Information ─────────────────────────────────── Time/Date: The current time and date. Today's Stats: Calls ─ # of calls today Posts ─ # of public posts today Email ─ # of EMail messages sent to day Newusers ─ # of new users today Feedback ─ # of EMail messages sent to the Sysop today # UL ─ # of Uploads today Kb UL ─ How many K was uploaded today # DL ─ # of Downloads today Kb DL ─ How many K was downloaded today Minutes ─ # of minutes the board was used today Overlays ─ Where the BBS loads itself into (Disk/EMS/XMS) Megs ─ Megabytes left free on the current Drive System Averages: Calls ─ The average # of calls per day Posts ─ The average # of posts per day # UL ─ The average # of U/Loads per day # DL ─ The average # of D/Loads per day Activity ─ The average activity (in %) per day System Totals: Calls ─ Total # of calls the BBS has had Posts ─ Total # of posts the BBS has had # UL ─ Total # of Uploads the BBS has had # DL ─ Total # of D/Loads the BBS has had Days ─ Total # of Days the BBS has been online Other Info: Node ─ Which node is currently on screen Errors─ How many fatal errors occurred today Mail ─ # of EMail in the Sysop's Mailbox Users ─ Total # of Users the BBS currently has Under ─ Shows what program you are running the BBS from. (Windows, OS/2, DesqView.) ──────────────────────────────── Chapter 1─E: WFC Screen Commands ──────────────────────────────── A Sends the "modem answer" command to the modem. It is normally not used, but for testing the connections and when you have an error, this is helpful. If everything is configured correctly, the BBS should automatically answer the phone. B Enters the Message Base Editor (See Chapter 9) C Displays todays list of callers. D Drops to the OS command shell, allowing you to use some commands that aren't available through Mini-DOS. Type EXIT to retrun to the WFC Screen. E Enters the Event Editor (See Chapter 12) F Enters the File Base Editor (See Chapter 8) H Sends the Hangup string to the modem. I Sends the Initialization string to the modem. L Displays the Sysop Logs. You can display either todays log, or the backlog for up to how ever many days you define as the maximum in the System Configuration. M Allows reading of All Email messages posted to the system. It does not specify the viewing of a particular users email. N Displays the list of users currently online. (MultiNode Only) O Sends the Offhook string to the modem P Allows the Sysop to pack the message bases. Q Exits the BBS and returns to the OS with an ERRORLEVEL of 255. R Prompts for a username, and then displays the contents of that users mailbox. S Enters the System Configuration. (See Chapter 6) U Enters the User Editor. (See Chapter 7) V Enters the Voting Editor (See Chapter 13) W Allows you to send Email messages to other users, either individually or via various mass mail criteria. X Enters the Protocol Editor (See Chapter 10) Z Displays the usage log information contained in the HISTORY.DAT file, which contains a record of all general system activity. Just to note, the percent activity is roughly the number of minutes used that day divided by 1440 minutes (24 hours). # Enters the Menu Editor (See Chapter 11) ! Validate Files - If you're not setup to autovalidate uploads, this will allow you to validate them either manually or automatically. [SPACE] Brings up the WFC local logon prompt. Choosing Y will proceed with a normal logon, pressing F will do a fast logon (skips most of the welcome screens) and pressing N returns you to the WFC. If Local Security Protection is turned On, the Fast Logon option will not be available. $ Loads the Conference Editor (See Chapter 14) [TAB] Switches you between modem and WFC mode. In modem mode, you can send commands to the modem, but if the phone rings, Renegade will still answer the call. If Local Security Protection is turned On (See Chapter 6-E), then only two commands are available from the WFC Screen; [SPACE] and Q. Pressing Q will exit to DOS, just like the normal WFC command. [SPACE] will bring up a prompt for the sysop password. If the password is entered correctly, then the WFC can be used normally. If someone logs on, when they logoff the WFC screen will blank and then ask for the Password again. If the password is entered, and the WFC screen remains idle, after a time it'll prompt for the password again before functioning normally. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 2 - Sysop Function Keys ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The following function keys are available only when a user is online: (Alt-x, where x is the letter you're pressing; Alt key+x key together) Alt-B Toggles "beep─after─end" on and off. This feature will take the phone offhook and sound an alarm when the user logs off, letting you know that the system is available for use. Alt-C Toggles chat mode on and off. Alt-E Allows modification of the user's security information (SL, DSL, AR & AC flags, file points). Prints the "SysOp working" string to the user while this window is displayed. Alt-F Prints fake line noise to the user. Alt-G Allows enabling and disabling of activity trapping and chat capturing for a user. Alt-H Hang up on a user and return to the WFC menu. Alt-I Toggles the User's input On and Off. For the obvious reasons, user input is toggled On. If toggled Off, then the users keystrokes won't do anything. Alt-K Allows you to select a Hangup message to display (HANGUPnn.*) before hanging up on the user and returning to the WFC menu. This option has caused an undue amount of confusion in it's time. When you press Alt-K, the following prompt appears in the Sysop Window. Display what hangup file (HANGUPxx) : > The prompt is misleading; it can be interpreted as telling a sysop to input the entire filename of the hangup file they want to display. Uh uh. Let's say you've got hangup files HANGUP1.ASC and HANGUP11.ANS. In order for the file to display, you must type the number of the HANGUP file and nothing more. Ie; When you want to display HANGUP1.ASC, you would type 1 when prompted. If you wanted to display HANGUP11.ANS, you'd type 11. The prompt is also misleading in that it shows it'll accept two characters. It is okay to use 1 character, as in HANGUP1.ASC above. Renegade won't complain. However, if you named the file HANGUP01.ASC and then pressed 1 at the prompt, HANGUP01.ASC would not display; Renegade would be looking for 01, not 1. Basically, whatever you input is what Renegade is going to be looking for after the HANGUP portion of the filename. Alt-L Toggles the local screen on and off. Alt-M Toggles temporary SysOp access for a user. If the user still has Temp SysOp access when they logoff, they will be returned to their original status when next they call. Alt-N Switches you to the next SysOp window in order. Sysop Window must be turned on; see Alt-S Alt-O Conference System toggle. If toggled to off, any access levels requiring the user to be in a certain conference are ignored. Alt-P Displays a file from the local harddisk to the remote user. Alt-Q Turns off the "user attempted to chat" alarm. If a user pages the sysop when he's available and the sysop doesn't answer, this annoying little pager sound will continue. The only way to stop it is to break into chat with the user, wait until they logoff, or use Alt-Q. :) Alt-R Displays the chat reason in the SysOp window. Sysop Window must be turned on; see Alt-S Alt-S Toggles the SysOp window on and off. Alt-T Toggles the SysOp window display between the top and bottom of the local screen. Alt-U Toggles the user's input and output on and off. Users input and output is toggled on at the beginning of each call by default. If toggled off, then the users keystrokes will not do anything. In addition, the remote display will no longer be updated; the remote user's screen is in essence frozen until the sysop presses Alt-U again, or the caller hangs up. Alt-V Prompts the sysop for a validation level (as defined in Subscription/Validation levels; See Chapter 6-G) and then validates the online user at the chosen level. Alt-W Same as Alt-E except that the "SysOp working" string is not displayed. Alt-Z Sends a continuous stream of beeps until the user presses a key or hangs up. Alt-+ Adds five minutes to a user's total time left. Alt-- Subtracts five minutes from a user's total time left. Alt-(F1-F5) Changes to SysOp Window 1─5 depending on which Function key you hit (F1─F5). Sysop Window must be turned on; see Alt-S F1─F10 Hitting one of these keys will activate the SysOp Defined Macro that was defined in System Variables. (See Chapter 6-D) Ctrl-Home Shows a help screen with all of the SysOp function keys and a brief description. The following function keys are available anywhere in the system, whether or not a user is online: Alt-n Executes a batch file called "GLOBATn.BAT", where "n" is a number from 1 to 9. (ie, if you have a batch file named GLOBAT1.BAT, and press Alt-1, Renegade will immediately run that batch file, Alt-2 runs GLOBAT2.BAT, and so on) The GLOBATn.BAT files must be present in your main BBS directory. Alt-D Prompts for a filename and then captures the contents of the screen to that filename. Alt-J Performs a local shell to DOS. Sends the "SysOp has shelled to DOS" string before entering DOS, and the "thank you for waiting" string after returning. Scroll Lock Toggles Sysop Availability for chat. If On, Sysop is *not* available for chat at all. If Off, then the regularly defined chat hours are used (if none are defined, then the sysop pager will always be active, unless Scroll Lock is turned On) Ctrl-SysRq Allows the SysOp to choose to generate a run time error. (Cute, huh? :)) ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 3 - ACS System ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Most of the ACS functions have the same basic syntax: A letter followed by the parameter of the function (not case sensitive). Function : "Annn" Description: Age of user To be True : Must be at least "nnn" years old. Function : "Bnnn" Description: Baud rate To be True : Must be connected at "nnn"00 baud. Function : "Cx" Description: Conference To be True : Must be in Conference x (@─Z). Function : "Dnnn" Description: DSL To be True : Must have DSL of "nnn" or higher. Function : "Ex" Description: Emulation To be True : Must be in Emulation x. (A=ANSI,V=AVATAR,R=RIP,N=NONE) Function : "Fx" Description: AR flag To be True : Must have AR flag "x" (A─Z). Function : "Gx" Description: Gender To be True : Must have gender "x" (M/F). Function : "II" Description: Invisible Mode To be True : Must be in Invisible Mode. Function : "JJ" Description: Novice Mode To be True : Must not be in Expert Mode. Function : "Knn" Description: Message Base To be True : Must be in Message Base #nn. Function : "Lnn" Description: File Base To be True : Must be in File Base #nn. Function : "MM" Description: Voting To be True : Must have voted on all of the voting topics. Function : "Nnn" Description: Node Number To be True : Must be on node #nn. Function : "OO" Description: SysOp Status To be True : SysOp is available. Function : "Pnnn" Description: Credits To be True : Must have at least "nnn" credits in account. Function : "Rx" Description: AC flag To be True : Must have AC flag "x" (LCVBA*PEKM1234). Function : "Snnn" Description: SL level To be True : Must have an SL level of at least "nnn". Function : "Tnnn" Description: Time left To be True : Must have at least "nnn" minutes of time left online. Function : "Unnn" Description: User number To be True : Must be user number "nnn". Function : "VV" Description: Validation To be True : Must be a validated user. Function : "Wn" Description: Day of the Week To be True : n must equal current day (0=Sunday .. 6 = Saturday) Function : "Xnn" Description: Subscription expiration To be True : "nn" must be greater than or equal to the number of days remaining before the user's subscription expires. Function : "Ynnn" Description: Time of day To be True : Must be at least "nnn" minutes after midnight. Function : "ZZ" Description: Post/Call Ratio To be True : Must have enough posts per call for their SL. Some examples: "A21" ─ Must be 21 years old. "B96" ─ Must be connected at 9600 baud or higher. "FS" ─ Must have AR flag "S". "T20" ─ Must have at least 20 minutes time left. "Y360" ─ Must be later than 6:00 am. "N1ER" ─ Must be logged onto node 1 with RIP active. For added ACS control, there are five logical operators that can be used. For access to happen: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "&" ─ Logical AND ─ both must be true "|" ─ Logical OR ─ either can be true "!" ─ Logical NOT ─ first is true second isn't These are the all on/off settings: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "^" ─ Logical TRUE ─ everything is true "%" ─ Logical FALSE ─ everything is false Examples: ~~~~~~~~ AND ─ "S20D50" requires the user has an SL of 20 *AND* a DSL of 50. OR ─ "S20|FA" requires that the user have either SL 20 *OR* AR flag "A". NOT ─ "!FA" requires that the user *NOT* have AR flag "A". The TRUE and FALSE operators are used to give everyone access, or to give nobody access. "^" means ALL users have access, and "%" means NO users at all have access. For even more complex ACS's, parentheses are allowed to group ACS settings together to be compared to another set: "S20FA|D255" means that the user must have at least SL 20 *AND* AR flag "A" *OR* DSL 255. A few more examples: S50 User must have SL 50 or higher (50─255). !S50 User must *NOT* have SL 50 (0─49). VV|U1 User must be validated *OR* be user #1. A21FAS50 User must be 21 years old *AND* have AR flag "A" *AND* have SL 50. !(A21FAS50) User must *NOT* be 21 years old, have AR flag "A", or have SL 50. !N234 User must *NOT* be logged onto node 234. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 4 - Special Files ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Unless otherwise noted, all files mentioned in this section must be present in your MISC directory off the Renegade main path. ───────────────────────── Chapter 4─A: The BBS List ───────────────────────── Renegade's BBS List is now in binary format. It stores more information, and allows the person entering the BBS into the list to edit the information later. It displays in two formats, regular (the short, traditional format) and an extended version that includes much more thorough information. The BBS List will now sort itself automatically, so no third party utils will be required. Regular List: You can configure the format of the regular list with the following three files. BBSNH.xxx <── The Header BBSNT.xxx <── The Trailer BBSMN.xxx <── The information displayed in between Extended Format: You can configure the format of the extended list with the following three files. BBSEH.xxx <── The Header BBSET.xxx <── The Trailer BBSME.xxx <── The information displayed in between In BBSMx.xxx, you can use the following local MCI codes: ~BN BBS Name ~DA Date Added ~DE Date Edited ~DS Description ~PN Phone Number ~SN SysOp Name ~SP Speed ~SW Software ~UN User Added You are limited to 1024 bytes in BBSMx.xxx and all other configurable listings. Since this is for each entry, and *before* MCI interpretation, if you use that much, people are going to fall asleep waiting for the listing to end. ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 4─B: The Last Callers List ────────────────────────────────── Renegade's Last Callers List is now configurable: Header: LASTH.xxx Middle: LASTM.xxx Trailer: LASTT.xxx You can customize LASTM.xxx with the following local MCI codes: ~CA Caller number ~DK Download Kbytes ~DL Downloads ~ES Email sent ~FS Feedback sent ~LC Location ~LO Logon time ~LT Logoff time ~MP Messages Posted ~MR Messages Read ~ND Node Number ~NU * if new, else space ~SP Speed ~TO Time On (minutes) ~UK Upload Kbytes ~UL Uploads ~UN User Name ───────────────────────────────── Chapter 4─C: The Who's On Listing ───────────────────────────────── Renegade's Who's On Listing is now configurable: Header: NODELH.xxx Middle: NODELM.xxx Trailer: NODELT.xxx You can customize NODELM.xxx with the following local MCI codes: ~AC Activity ~AG Age ~AT Node active (Y/N) ~AV Available (Y/N) ~LC Location ~TO Time On ~NN Node number ~UN Name ~RM Room number ~SX Sex All of these MCI codes return "─" when a user is not on that node, or is invisible. ───────────────────────────── Chapter 4─D: The User Listing ───────────────────────────── Renegade's User Listing is now configurable: Header: USERH.xxx Middle: USERM.xxx Trailer: USERT.xxx You can customize USERM.xxx with the following local MCI codes: ~DL Downloads ~DK Download kbytes ~LC Location ~LO Last on date ~NO Note ~RN Real Name ~SX User Sex ~UK Upload kbytes ~UL Uploads ~UN User Name ~U1 User Definable 1 ~U2 User Definable 2 ~U3 User Definable 3 ~AG AGE ~MP Message Posts ────────────────────────────── Chapter 4─E: The Trashcan File ────────────────────────────── This file has gone undocumented for a very long time. :) What it is, simply, is a plaintext file called TRASHCAN.TXT in your MISC directory containing the names of people, or words, that you do not want to be able to apply to your system. The format is one name per line, one after the other. Example: ---BEGIN FILE--- Ken Reaverson Adrian Blood Pretty Hate Machine ---END FILE--- If I were to apply to your board, and this is what your TRASHCAN.TXT looked like, I would receive the message 'Sorry, can't use that name' and prompted to enter my name/handle again. It is not case sensitive, but it is spelling sensitive. Also, there are no wildcards allowed (Adrian* will not prevent Adrian Paul, Adrian Blood, or Adrian Blackburn from applying to your system ;)) ──────────────────────────────── Chapter 4─F: The NEWLET.ASC File ──────────────────────────────── This file, if it exists, will be sent to a new user when his account is saved to the user record. The file should be left in the MISC directory. It has the following format: ───────────────────── [FROM] [SUBJECT] { MESSAGE TEXT (FIRST LINE) . . . (LAST LINE) } ───────────────────── Each is on a separate line, and FROM is on the first line. Any replies to this message are sent to the same user number as the new user application. ──────────────────────────── Chapter 4─G: The Global Menu ──────────────────────────── The Global Menu is an optional menu that can do some pretty cool stuff. Any command inserted into the global menu can be run from anywhere on the BBS. All regular Menu CmdKeys will work, with one exception. The GOSUB (-/) command will not work from the Global Menu. If the Global Menu is not already present, you'll have to create it yourself. Be very careful how you assign commands on the Global Menu. Make sure that the letters you assign aren't used anywhere else on the BBS, or they'll be run in sequence, and the results will probably be something different than what you had hoped for. Example: Let's say I want to insert a command that will check and see what users are online. I create a menu named GLOBAL.MNU in my MENU directory. I load up the Menu Editor and insert a new command that looks something like this: Menu filename: GLOBAL Command #1 of 2 1. Long descript :(/W)ho's Online 2. Short descript:(/W)ho's Online 3. Menu keys :/W 4. ACS required :"" 5. Cmdkeys :NO ;(This is the CmdKey for the Who's On List) 6. Options : Flags :None Q. Quit From now on, no matter where I am, if I press /W, the Who's On List will display. Now, imagine if I had assigned the Menu Key as L instead of /W. If that had been the case, anywhere there was an L command already present, it would have run the present command first, and then the global one. So at the Main Menu, the Callers Today list would have displayed, followed immediately by the Whos On list. If you had to create the GLOBAL.MNU yourself, delete the Quit to Main Menu command already present in the menu; it's redundant. If there's a menu you *don't* want using the global commands, you can turn them off. Most of the default menus allow the use of the Global commands, and all new menus you create default to being able to use the menu commands. See Chapter 11-B for information on changing whether or not a menu uses the global commands. ──────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 4─H: The READP, FILEP, and NEWINFO Menus ──────────────────────────────────────────────── All three of the menus in this section must exist in the MENU directory off the main Renegade Path. READP.MNU This is the menu that's used while reading any message on the BBS. Do *not* delete this file under any circumstance, and do not rename it. Renegade looks for the filename READP.MNU, bad things happen when it doesn't exist. ;) You can change the menu prompt, add in extra commands, and modify it just like any other menu, just be careful to keep the message reading and replying commands there. ;) FILEP.MNU The FILEP.MNU serves the same function as the READP.MNU, except it's used when listing files. The cautions with the READP.MNU apply here as well, do *not* delete or rename this file. NEWINFO.MNU As above, do not delete or rename this file, Renegade expects it, and new users won't be able to complete the application process if it doesn't exist. This is the final step before the user is actually saved to the user record. At this menu, they can change the information they've been asked during the application process. It is important to note; while at this menu, the user does not have a user number. Do not use any commands which will check for a user number, because it'll bomb out. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 5 - Changing Colors ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── There are 2 easy ways of changing colors in Renegade. The first method is usable almost everywhere in Renegade. When you're where you want to change to another color, press [Ctrl─P] and then enter a number from 0─9. Control─P is actually a macro type of key, because when you do hit Control P, a ^ appears. The ^ is the actual, better way to change the colors. From then on, the color will be the one you set with the last command. It will stay the same color until the color is changed again by either the system or by another color code sequence. NOTE: Just because the [Ctrl─P] key sequence does not produce ~~~~ the "^", doesn't mean you cannot change the color. Simply enter the "^" yourself. NOTE: As of 4─05 Exp, pressing Ctrl─P then the # will produce the string. ie, [ctrl─p] 1 will produce "^1". In previous versions, the color change was instant and the user never saw the ^# part of the string. Another way which can be used is called the Pipe System. Where you want to change the color, enter a "|nn" (w/out quotes). The nn is a number between 00 and 23. (2 digits MUST be used.). The first 16 colors (00─15) affect the foreground color, and the last 8 (16─23) affect the background color. The colors are as follows: (B. = Bright, D. = Dark) 00: Black 08: D. Grey 16: Black 01: Blue 09: B. Blue 17: Blue 02: Green 10: B. Green 18: Green 03: Cyan 11: B. Cyan 19: Cyan 04: Red 12: B. Red 20: Red 05: Purple 13: B. Purple 21: Purple 06: Brown 14: Yellow 22: Brown 07: Grey 15: B. White 23: White NOTE: On some cases, if you have used the ^# method of changing colors ~~~~ and the color you changed to with the ^ was flashing, you might have to enter another NON─FLASHING ^ code before you enter a pipe code. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6 - System Configuration ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The main part of keeping Renegade set and going is the way you set up the system configuration. This section is normally selected by the "S" command at the WFC screen. Once there, the following menu is displayed: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── System configuration: A. Main BBS Configuration B. Modem/Node Configuration C. System ACS Settings D. System Variables E. System Toggles F. File System Configuration G. Subscription/Validation System H. Network Configuration I. Offline Mail Configuration J. String Configuration K. Color Configuration L. Archive Configuration M. Credit System Configuration 1. Time allowed per day 2. Max calls per day 3. UL/DL # files ratio 4. UL/DL K─bytes ratio 5. Post/Call ratio 6. Max downloads per day 7. Max download kbytes per day 8. Update System Averages Enter selection (A─L,1─8) [Q]uit : ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Selecting one of the keys will take you to the corresponding section of the system configuration. Pressing "Q" will take you back to the WFC screen (or the SysOp Menu). ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─A: Main BBS Configuration ─────────────────────────────────── This area is where many of the different BBS options are configured. After you select this option, the following menu is displayed: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Main BBS Configuration A. BBS name/number :The Happy Hunting Grounds (770─123─4567) B. SysOp's name :Malar Beastlord C. D. SysOp chat hours :*None* E. Minimum baud hours :Always allowed F. Regular DL hours :Always allowed G. Minimum baud DL hrs:Always allowed H. BBS Passwords I. Pre─event warning :60 seconds J. Startout menu :START K. Bulletin Prefix :BULLET L. Multinode support:Off M. Network mode :Off 0. Main data files dir. :C:\RG\DATA\ 1. Miscellaneous Files dir.:C:\RG\MISC\ 2. Message file storage dir:C:\RG\MSGS\ 3. Menu file directory :C:\RG\MENU\ 4. Nodelist (Version 7) dir:C:\IM\NODELIST\ 5. Log files/trap files dir:C:\RG\LOGS\ 6. Temporary directory :C:\RG\TEMP\ 7. Protocols directory :C:\RG\PROT 8. Archivers directory :C:\DOS\ 9. File attach directory :C:\RG\FILE\ R. RAM drive/multinode path:D:\ Enter selection (A─M,R,0─9) [Q]uit : ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This option allows you to enter the name and the phone number of your BBS. The Name defined here is what will be displayed by the %BN MCI Code, and the Phone number is what will be displayed by the %BP MCI Code. B This option allows you to enter the username of the SysOp. This is mostly cosmetic; the only thing this option determines is what the %SN MCI Code will display. D This option allows you to declare your chat hours. When someone pages you during these hours, a bell will sound to inform you that a user wishes to chat. NOTE: If you do not declare chat hours, your users will be able to page you at all hours. E This option defines the hours that the minimum baud rate callers may log on. Some SysOps prefer to restrict the hours available to users of lower baud modems for various reasons. F This option defines the hours that file downloading is allowed. G This option defines the hours that low baud callers may download files. H This option brings up something like the following display: System Passwords: A. SysOp password :DOWN B. New user password :FOR C. Baud override password:LIFE A. Defines the SysOp Password. This is the only one of the three passwords that must be defined. In general, this is the password that will be prompted for when using all Sysop specific commands. B. If this is defined, then any newuser applying to the system will need to input this password when prompted before continuing with the application process. If this password is not defined, then nothing will be asked for, and a user may apply to the system unhindered. C. If this password is defined and a user connects at a baud rate lower than the minimum logon baud rate defined in the System Variables (See Chapter 6-D), then the user will be prompted for this password. If they get it right, they'll be allowed to logon. If they get it wrong, Renegade will hang up on them. If the password is not defined and a user connects at a lower baud rate than allowed, they'll simply be hung up on. I This options sets the number of seconds before a scheduled event is run in which the user is warned. In other words, if you've got an event running in two minutes, and this option is set to 60 seconds, Renegade would warn the user one minute before the event logged them off. If you an event was about to run in 5 minutes, and this option was set to 300 seconds, then the user would be warned five minutes in advance. J Menu where users with an undefined Startout menu will start from. (Normally set to MAIN) The Startout menu is the menu which the user is first in contact with. Some SysOps prefer to have the menu set to something else to perform some type of maintenance before the user gets to the main menu. K Prefix of the Bulletin Files. (Normally left Blank or set to BULLET) Refer to Chapter 11─D─12, Sub─Bulletins under the OS CmdKey for an explanation. L This option allows you to tell Renegade if it has 1 or more nodes. (If multi─node, you must use the ─Nx command to load node x.) M This option will allow you to turn the Network mode on. It activates the following: a) Forces local security on. b) Disables all function keys unless a SysOp is logged on. c) Disables the SysOp window system. d) All WFC commands are disabled except [SPACE] and Q. e) If no node is specified on the command line, the node will assume it is a local node, and automatically configure itself as the next available node number. NOTE: As of this writing, e is broken; Renegade will load in local mode, but it'll load as node 1, even if there is a node one already loaded. The authors have been informed of the problem; the moral of the story is to make damned sure you load a node number on the commandline. R This option defines the drive where multinode and such information is stored. This can be a RAM drive to increase performance. The MultiNode Data <MULTNODE.DAT> file (which stores who is on what node, their location, activity, sex, time online) and any messages sent from one node to another are stored in this directory. 0 This option defines the directory in which your main data files are stored. (.DAT, .DIR, etc.) 1 This option defines the directory in which your text files are stored. (.ANS, .ASC, .INF, .ASW, etc.) 2 This option defines the directory in which your messages are stored. (.BRD, .MIX, etc.) 3 This option defines the directory in which the menu files are stored. (.MNU) 4 This option defines the directory in which the Version 7 Nodelist files will be stored. A Version 7 Nodelist is something compiled by a third party program. It is *not* the text file containing names, locations and phone numbers, and so on; that's the raw nodelist. The author of this documentation recommends QNode, written by James West, which should be available on any decent support BBS. What a Version 7 Nodelist does is aid in sending Netmail. If a Version 7 Nodelist exists, Renegade is able to fill in most of the blanks for you. When sending netmail without a Version 7 Nodelist defined, Renegade will ask for the following: Name of recipient, their address, and then the subject. It is quite possible for a message to be addressed incorrectly in this manner. If a Version 7 nodelist is defined, Renegade is a little more helpful; When sending Netmail, Renegade will ask for either a name or address: Enter a name, a Fidonet address, or an Internet address. : The Name it's looking for in this case is the name of the sysop, which is not necessarily the person you want to address the netmail to. If you don't know the name of the sysop, but you do know the address, use it. If you enter an invalid address, Renegade will form you of as much and ask you to try again. If you enter a valid address, a screen something like the following pops up: Enter a name, a Fidonet address, or an Internet address. :1:114/252 System: The Courts of Chaos (1:114/252) SysOp : Patrick Spence Phone : 1-602-241-1039 Where : Mesa Az Cost : 0 credits Is this correct? No If you confirm this is the correct information, Renegade will next ask who you want this addressed this netmail (it'll fill in the sysops name by default). By using a Version 7 nodelist, the mail isn't going to be addressed to a non-existent node. It also makes a user confirm their choice, thereby lessening the chances of accidentally addressing the netmail somewhere else. 5 This option defines the directory in which the trap files, system log files and capture chat files are stored. (.LOG) 6 This option defines the directory in which temporary files are stored. This directory is used for various things to hold files while using them, but when they aren't permanent. 7 This option defines the directory in which the protocol drivers will be held. These include DSZ.EXE, HSLINK.EXE, etc. These files are used in the Protocol Editor as your file transfer programs. 8 This option defines the directory in which the archive drivers will be held. These include PKUNZIP.EXE, ARJ.EXE, PKZIP.EXE, RAR.EXE, etc. 9 This option defines the directory in which the files which are attached to Email and Netmail are to be sent to. ──────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─B: Modem Configuration ──────────────────────────────── Modem Configuration allows you to set up how the modem and Renegade will work together. Upon selecting this option, the following menu is displayed: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Modem/Node Configuration 1. Maximum baud rate: 38400 2. Port number : 2 3. Modem init : ATZ| 4. Modem answer : ATA| 5. Modem hangup : ^ 6. Modem offhook : ATH1M0| 7. COM port locking : On 8. Digiboard support: Off 9. CTS/RTS flow : On A. XON/XOFF flow : Off B. Drop file path : C:\RG\DOOR\ C. ACS for this node: D. TeleConf Normal : [%UN]: J. Answer on ring : 0 E. TeleConf Anon : [??]: K. MultiRing only : Off F. TeleConf Global : [%UN GLOBAL]: G. TeleConf Private : [%UN PRIVATE]: H. IRQ string : 4 I. Address string : 02F8 R. Modem result codes Enter selection (1─9, A─K, R) [Q]uit : ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Note that the command strings can contain the following special characters: "|" Sends a carriage return (^M) to the modem. "^x" Sends a control character to the modem. (^M can be typed as a | here.) "~" Performs a half─second delay before sending the next character to the modem. "^" Toggles DTR for .25 seconds. Each menu option is described in detail below. 1 This is where you can set the maximum baud rate of your modem. If you're locking the COM port, this is the speed at which the port will be locked. 2 This is the COM port that this nodes modem is connected to, which can be COM1 through COM64. 3 This is the command that initializes the modem. This is VERY important, as it tells the modem how to operate under the BBS environment. Words of Advice: If your modem has the ability to store user profiles in its volatile memory, use it. Renegade likes a short init string. 4 This is the command that Renegade sends to the modem in order to answer an incoming call. 5 This is the command that hangs up the modem. NOTE: As of 4─05 Exp, if the hangup string is not defined, or does not contain a DTR toggle, the modem will not hangup. In this way, Renegade may be used as a Door. Make damned sure there's a ^ somewhere in that string. I personally use only ^. It's quite effective at dropping carrier. :) 6 This is the command that places the modem (and, consequently, the phone line) offhook. 7 This option toggles whether or not the COM port is locked. If your modem supports rates above 2400 baud, make sure this is set to On. 8 This option should be set if you are using a DigiBoard. What a Digiboard is, and what it does, is beyond the scope of this document. 9 This option toggles CTS/RTS flow control on or off. Flow control tells the computer or modem when to start and stop sending or receiving information to/from the other device. (CTS/RTS is also known as Hardware Flow Control.) A This option toggles XON/XOFF flow control on and off. (See information above about CTS/RTS flow control. XON/XOFF is also known as Software Flow Control.) Pick one or the other, but don't use both. The CTS/RTS is the preferable Flow Control. B The complete path to where the door files (CALLINFO.BBS, DORINFOx.DEF, DOOR.SYS, etc.) will be written for this node. (If blank, files are written to main BBS directory) If you define this directory, you must create it. Renegade will not do it for you. C A User must meet the ACS that is set here in order to login to this node. If they do not, when they login, the BBS will hang up on them. D The string defined here is what will be displayed in front of normal text sent from this node while in Teleconference. E The string defined here is what will be displayed in front of an anonymous message sent from this node while in Teleconference. F The string defined here is what will be displayed in front of a message sent from this node to the users current Global Channel while in Teleconference. (see Chapter 20 for more information on Teleconference and Global Channels) G The string defined here is what will be displayed in front of a Private message sent from this node while in Teleconference. H Important Note: This option does *not* tell Renegade which IRQ to use for this node. This option is cosmetic only; the value here is what will be shown by the %E MCI Code. I Important Note: This option does *not* tell Renegade what port address to use for this node. This option is cosmetic only; the value defined here is what will be shown by the %C MCI Code. If you need to set the comport to use a different IRQ and port address, you must do this through your fossil driver, not Renegade. J If you want the BBS to answer on a ring other then the first ring, enter the number here. K This will toggle the option to use the MultiRing (also called RingMate, and Distinctive Ringing) option. (Pick up after the set number of secondary rings.) R These are the result codes returned by the modem when the NO CARRIER and other various baud rate conditions are encountered. The menu that appears looks like this: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Modem configuration ─ Result Codes A. NO CARRIER : NO CARRIER B. RELIABLE : /ARQ C. OK : OK D. RING : RING E. CALLER ID : NMBR = F. ID in user note: Off G. CONNECT 300 : CONNECT H. CONNECT 600 : CONNECT 600 I. CONNECT 1200 : CONNECT 1200 J. CONNECT 2400 : CONNECT 2400 K. CONNECT 4800 : CONNECT 4800 L. CONNECT 7200 : CONNECT 7200 M. CONNECT 9600 : CONNECT 9600 N. CONNECT 12000 : CONNECT 12000 O. CONNECT 14400 : CONNECT 14400 P. CONNECT 16800 : CONNECT 16800 Q. CONNECT 19200 : CONNECT 19200 R. CONNECT 21600 : CONNECT 21600 S. CONNECT 24000 : CONNECT 24000 T. CONNECT 26600 : CONNECT 26600 U. CONNECT 28800 : CONNECT 28800 V. CONNECT 31200 : CONNECT 31200 W. CONNECT 33600 : CONNECT 33600 X. CONNECT 38400 : CONNECT 38400 Y. CONNECT 57600 : CONNECT 57600 Z. CONNECT 115200 : CONNECT 115200 ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A─D, and G through X are default result codes, and for all Hayes Compatible modems, these shouldn't be changed. E is the string that is received when you get CID information. Different modems use different strings; some use NMBR =, some use CALR =. Check your modems manual to find out which one you support. F is a toggle for CID. If you want the information (Phone Number, Name, etc.) to be inserted in the User's User Note, toggle this on. If you don't have CID, or don't want it inserted in the Note, leave this off. ──────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─C: System ACS Settings ──────────────────────────────── Upon selecting this option, the following menu is displayed: ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── System ACS settings A. Full SysOp :s255 B. Full Co─SysOp :s250 C. Msg Base SysOp :s200 D. File Base SysOp :s200 E. SysOp PW at logon:s255 F. Add voting choice:s125 G. Post public :vv H. Send e─mail :^ I. See anon pub post:s100 J. See anon E─mail :% K. Global Anon post :s100 L. E─mail anon :% M. See unval. files :vv N. DL unval. files :s200 O. No UL/DL ratio :s30 P. No PostCall ratio:s200 R. No file point chk:^ S. ULs auto─credited:s250 T. MCI in TeleConf :s250 U. Chat at any hour :s250 V. Send Netmail :% W. "Invisible" Mode :s250 X. Mail file attach :vv Y. Change a vote :^ Enter selection (A─Y) [Q]uit : ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This setting defines the security level for a full SysOp. NOTE: This also defines the level for which the //\\XX global command keys can be set. I highly recommend this be set to u1 instead of s255. B This is the ACS Level that a user must have in order to be qualified as a Full Co-Sysop. C This setting defines the security level for a message base SysOp. D This setting defines the security level for a file base SysOp. NOTE: C and D are more or less obsolete these days. With the addition of the FILEP and READP menus, a sysop can change who has access to what commands. In addition, each message base has it's own setting for Sysop ACS. You can change the strings as they're defined here, but they don't really do anything. :) E This setting defines the security level in which the SysOp password must be specified during the logon process. F This is the access needed to add a voting choice when the topic is added with "add choices off". G This setting defines the security level required to post normal public mail. H This setting is similar to option G, except that it pertains to normal Email. NOTE: If you set this to a higher ACS than a New User who has just applied to the system has, they *will not* be able to send a newuser letter to the sysop. I If a user qualifies for this ACS level, they will be able to see the real name or handle on any anonymous public messages. The message header would look something like this: Date: 8:49 pm Fri Apr 10, 1998 Number : 1 of 1 From: <<<<Anonymous>>>> Base : General Stuff To : All Refer #: None Subj: Boo! Replies: None Stat: Normal Origin : Local Real: Adrian Blood to All Only those meeting this ACS see the Real: portion of the header. Everyone else would see this: Date: 8:49 pm Fri Apr 10, 1998 Number : 1 of 1 From: <<<<Anonymous>>>> Base : General Stuff To : All Refer #: None Subj: Boo! Replies: None Stat: Normal Origin : Local J This setting is similar to option I above, except that it pertains to normal Email instead of public messages. K This setting defines the security level that allows a user to post anonymously on ANY message base. If a user meets this ACS, it will override the individual anonymous settings for each individual message base (the one exception to this is if it's set to %; if % is used, then the individual base settings will still be honored.) If you use ^ here, then users will be able to post anonymously on any public message base, regardless of the individual settins. L This setting is similar to option K, except that it deals with Email. M This setting defines the security level that allows a user to see unvalidated files when looking through the file lists. N This setting defines the security level that allows a user to download unvalidated files. O This setting defines the security level at which upload/ download ratio checking is turned off. P This setting defines the security level at which the post/ call ratio check is turned off. R This setting defines the security level at which file point checking is turned off. S This setting defines the security level at which uploaded files are automatically credited to the uploader. (This is useful to prevent uploading of "garbage" files to balance an UL/DL ratio for further downloading.) T This setting defines the ACS needed to use MCI codes in the teleconference area. U This setting defines the security level at which a user can force a chat page with the SysOp when he is not available. V This setting defines the security level at which a user can send Netmail to another BBS on a network. W This setting defines the security level at which a user can logon to the BBS (in multi─node mode only) and be "Invisible" to the other nodes when they log on, and in the node listing X This setting defines the security level at which a user can "attach" a file to mail that they send on the board. Y This setting defines the security level at which a user can change his vote in the voting section. ───────────────────────────── Chapter 6─D: System Variables ───────────────────────────── Upon selecting this option, the following menu is displayed: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── System variables A. Max private sent per call:255 B. Max feedback sent per call:5 C. Max public posts per call:255 D. Max chat attempts per call:3 E. Normal max mail waiting :25 F. CoSysOp max mail waiting :50 G. Logins before bday check :0 H. Swap shell should use :EMS I. Number of logon attempts :3 J. Password change every :0 days K. SysOp chat color :9 L. User chat color :3 M. Min. space for posts :100 N. Min. space for uploads :500 O. Back SysOp Log keep days :7 P. Blank WFC menu minutes :2 R. Alert beep delay :5 S. Number of system callers :0 T. Minimum logon baud rate :9600 U. Minimum download baud rate:9600 0. F1 Macro :"" 1. F2 Macro :"" 2. F3 Macro :"" 3. F4 Macro :"" 4. F5 Macro :"" 5. F6 Macro :"" 6. F7 Macro :"" 7. F8 Macro :"" 8. F9 Macro :"" 9.F10 Macro :"" Enter selection (A─U,1─9) [Q]uit : ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This option sets the limit for the amount of Email that any single caller can leave during a call. B This option sets the limit for the number of feedback messages that any single caller can send during a call. C This option sets the limit for the number of public messages that any single caller can send during a call. D This option sets the limit for the number of chat attempts that any single caller can make during a call. E This option sets the limit for the amount of Email that can be kept waiting for a certain user. F This option sets the limit for the amount of Email that can be kept waiting for a Co─SysOp. G This option sets the number of logons a user can have before the BBS checks to see (as a security feature) if the user knows what the birthdate they entered into the BBS at the first logon. H This option tells the BBS where to swap memory to when the BBS "swaps" out of Renegade. The locations are either (D)isk, (E)MS Memory, (X)MS Memory, (N)on XMS Extended Memory or (A)nywhere. I This option sets the number of attempts a user can make to log on to the BBS, before the BBS hangs up on them. J This option sets the amount of days before a user has to change their password as a security precaution. K This option sets the SysOp chat color. This only matters to the users that can view ANSI colors, as this color is the one that is used while the SysOp is typing. L This goes along with option K, except that it's the user chat color. (In case you're wondering.. the reason there are 2 different colors for chat is basically so that the SysOp and user knows who said what.) M This option sets the minimum amount of hard drive space (in K) that must be available on the hard drive in order to post a message. N Pretty much the same as option M, except that it deals with the minimum amount of free space in order to upload. If less than this space is available, uploads will not be permitted. O This option sets the number of days that the SysOp back logs are kept. (Maximum is 15 days.) P This option sets the time of inactivity before the WFC screen is blanked. (Screen Saver) R When a user pages the Sysop, and he doesn't answer, the PC speaker on his end will continue to emit a very irritating sound to let him know someone tried to page him. This option defines the number of seconds between the irritating noises. S This option defines the number of calls the BBS has received. This number is automatically incremented each time a user remotely logs into the BBS. T This option defines the minimum baud rate that can call into the BBS. (This is normally used to "lock─out" 300 baud users who are too slow to do much.) U This option defines the minimum baud rate that can download files from the BBS. (See note on option T) 0─9 These are the F1─F10 SysOp Definable Macros that only the SysOp can use on the BBS. If the sysop presses F1 on the local keyboard, then what is defined as the F1 macro is what will be displayed. ─────────────────────────── Chapter 6─E: System Toggles ─────────────────────────── Upon selection this option, the following menu is displayed: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── System flagged functions A. Handles allowed on system:On B. Phone number in logon :On C. Local security protection:Off D. Use EMS for overlay file :On E. Global activity trapping :Off F. Auto chat buffer open :Off G. AutoMessage in logon :Off H. Bulletins in logon :Off I. Last few callers in logon:Off J. User info in logon :Off K. Strip color off SysOp Log:On L. Offhook in local logon :On M. Trap Teleconferencing :Off N. Compress file/msg numbers :On O. UL duplicate file search :On P. SysOp Log type :File only R. Use BIOS for video output:Off S. Use IEMSI handshakes :Off T. Refuse new users :Off U. Swap shell function :On V. Use shuttle logon :On W. Chat call paging :On X. Time limits are per call :Off Y. SysOp Password checking :On 1. New user message sent to :5 2. Mins before timeout bell :2 3. Mins before timeout :5 Enter selection (A─Y,1─3) [Q]uit : ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This option specifies whether or not handles are allowed on the system. (A handle is an alias. Like CB Radio.) Some users like the anonymous aspect of BBSing, but it IS your choice. B This option specifies whether or not the user's phone number is asked for during the logon process. C This option controls local security protection. When Local Security Protection is turned on, the sysop password must be entered from the WFC screen in order to do anything (though the Q command still works from the WFC screen, regardless of whether or not Local Security Protection is on). Also, all passwords will be masked on the local display, as if it were remote. This is useful if the local computer is located in a place where many people might be passing near it. This not only protects your user data, but prevents others from possibly causing harm to your BBS. All told, if you're the only one that ever sits down in front of your computer, it's safe to leave this Off. D This option specifies whether or not the RENEGADE.OVR file is to be accessed from EMS (expanded) memory. If the overlay can't be stored in EMS, Renegade will access the overlay from disk as usual. (Accessing the overlay via EMS is *much* faster than accessing it from disk.) NOTE: As of Renegade vXX─XXX, the overlay will load into XMS if it is available. This can speed things up and free up RAM if you unload your EMS driver. E This option controls global activity trapping. If set to On, it will log everything every user does to disk. (Trust me, turn this off. The trap file will eat your hard drive space very quickly.) F This option specifies whether or not to automatically open the chat buffer during a chat session. If On, the entire conversation will be recorded in the CHAT.LOG in your LOGS directory. G This option specifies whether or not the auto─message is displayed during the logon process. H If this is On, and any Bulletins have been updated since the users last call, this will tell them which bulletins have been updated and ask if they'd like to see them. If it is turned off, nothing about bulletins will be said during login. I This option specifies whether or not the last few callers list is displayed during the logon process. J This option specifies whether or not the user's status is shown during the logon process. If so, then it will read the YOURINFO.ASC present in your MISC directory. If the file does not exist, nothing will be displayed. K This option specifies whether or not Renegade's color codes will be stripped from the SysOp log. L This option specifies whether or not the phone should be taken off─hook during local logons. M This option will toggle whether or not the messages going through teleconferencing should be logged or not. N This option controls the "compression" of file and message base numbers. This option takes a little explaining... Say you have ten message bases (1─10), and bases 2, 6 and 9 are restricted from certain users. Normally when the list of message areas is displayed, those areas are not shown, leaving a gap in the listings (1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 10). If this option is set to on, all the message base numbers are made contiguous (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) to the user. They user won't realize that they're restricted from seeing something. The tradeoff is that system performance might suffer a little bit, and that the number of areas you're allowed to have with compression On (2,048) is significantly smaller than the number you can have with it turned off (65,535). O This option controls the search for duplicate files during the uploading procedure. If this is turned on, and Renegade detects a duplicate filename, the file just uploaded will be deleted. P This option controls the output of the SysOp log. You have three choices. File only ── Puts the log in the SYSOPxx.LOG file. Printer & file ── Same as File except it outputs the log to the printer also. Printer only ── Sends the log to the printer only. To date, the printer options are not working. R This option specifies whether or not ROM BIOS routines are to be used for all local screen output. S This option specifies whether or not IEMSI handshaking will take place or not. IEMSI is simply when the user defines certain pieces of information in his terminal program such as Real Name, Address and such... it basically speeds up the logon. T If this is on, then the BBS will not accept any new users. If it is off, they will be able to apply as normal. U This option defines if Renegade will Swap memory if it shells out of the BBS. Renegade tends to default this to Off when installed. Trust me, turn it on. :) V This option defines if the BBS will use the Shuttle Logon. W This option toggles Chat call paging. (After a user pages you, the board buzzes you to remind you that the user wants to chat.) X This option defines if the time limits are per call or per day. Y This option defines if most options (some are logon, most functions in SysOp menu, etc.) ask for the SysOp password before letting you execute the command. 1 This option defines the number of the user that will receive "new user" messages. NOTE: If you do not wish to have a new user message sent to anyone, select [D]isable. 2 This option specifies the number of minutes before the bell is sounded to alert the user that the system is about to "time out". NOTE: If you do not wish this to go into effect, select [D]isable 3 This option specifies the number of minutes that are allowed to pass with no activity before the system "times out". NOTE: If you do not wish this to go into effect, select [D]isable ─────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─F: File Section Configuration ─────────────────────────────────────── Upon selecting this option, the following menu is displayed: ───────────────────────────────────────── File section configuration A. Upload/download ratio system :On B. File point system :Off C. Daily download limits :Off D. Test and convert uploads :On E. Point rewarding system :Off F. Search for/User FILE─ID.DIZ :On G. Recompress like archives :Off H. Point reward compensation ratio:50% I. File point compensation ratio :4 to 1 J. Base file size per 1 file point:10k K. Upload time refund percent :150% L. "To─SysOp" file base :1 M. Auto─validate ALL files ULed? :No N. Max k─bytes allowed in temp dir:500 O. Min k─bytes to save for resume :100 Enter selection (A─O) [Q]uit : ───────────────────────────────────────── A This option specifies whether or not upload/download ratio checking is active. B This option specifies whether or not a file point file system is active. C This option turns the daily download limits on or off. D This option toggles if the uploads will be recommented and converted to the current file base's archive setting. E This command works with option H. If this is turned on, the user will receive the percentage defined in H of the files file point worth everytime the file is downloaded. F This option will toggle whether or not Renegade will search an uploaded file for FILE─ID.DIZ. (It is a file that describes what the file is, no matter what the user enters for information. It is a standard also used by PC Board.) G This option will toggle whether or not Renegade will recompress archives when the file is uploaded. (Helpful to force Maximum Compression, add a AV stamp, etc.) H This option defines the % of the file's points that is rewarded to the uploader whenever the file is downloaded. I This option defines how many points the user gets per file credits they've earned. ie, with the setting above, if a user uploaded a file worth 1 file point, they would receive 4. J This option defines what 1 file point is equal to in K. (ie: if set to 10k, every 10k of a file will charge the user 1 file point.) K This option defines the percentage of time that a user is refunded after uploading a file. L This option defines the file base that is set to "SysOp only". This is for SysOp─only uploads which are sent by putting a "\" as the first character in the file description. M This option specifies whether or not all uploaded files are to be auto─validated. N This option defines the maximum number of kilobytes allowed in the temporary archive working directory. O This option defines the minimum number of kilobytes that must have been sent during an upload before it can be saved for a resume─later upload operation. ─────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─G: Subscription/Validation Levels ─────────────────────────────────────────── This section describes the various subscription levels (26, A─Z) and the access they receive with the level (along with the expiration date.) Upon selecting this option, the following screen is displayed: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────── A. New User Settings B. Validated Access C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W. X. Y. Z. Subscription editor (?=help) : ───────────────────────────────────────────────────── Level (A) is always used for New Users, and option (B) is for Validated users. The other 24 levels are open for what you need. ────────────────────────────────────────── Subscription level A A. Description: New User Settings B. New SL : 10 C. New DSL : 10 D. AR flags : ────────────────────────── E. AC flags : ──────────/──── G. New credit : 0 H. Expiration : No expiration I. Expire to : No change K. AR upgrade : Hard L. AC upgrade : Hard M. Start menu : Enter selection (A─M) [Q]uit : ────────────────────────────────────────── A This option defines the Description of the Subscription Level. B This option defines the security level (SL) of the user. C This option defines the Download Security Level (DSL) of the user D This option defines the AR flags available for the subscription level. E This option defines the AC flags available for the subscription level. NOTE: A full list of the AC flags and their functions can be found in the Appendix. G When upgraded to this level, this is the amount of credit that will be added to the user current total. H This option defines the number of days until this subscription level expires. I This option defines what subscription level the user will be set to when the current one expires. K This option defines whether or not the AR Flag upgrade is hard or soft. If it is a Hard upgrade, then the user will be forced into this set of AR flags, and any others they may posses will be toggled off. If it is a Soft upgrade, then the any new AR flags made available by the subscription level will be toggled on. L This option defines whether or not the AC flag upgrade is hard or soft. See option K for an explanation on the difference between Hard and Soft upgrades. M This option defines the default start menu for the subscription level. ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─H: Network Configuration ────────────────────────────────── Upon selecting this option, the following menu is displayed: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Network configuration A. Net addresses B. Origin line : The Holy Church of Tremere C. Strip IFNA kludge lines : Yes 1. Color of standard text : 0 D. Strip SEEN─BY lines : Yes 2. Color of quoted text : 9 E. Strip origin lines : No 3. Color of tear line : 4 F. Add tear/origin line : Yes 4. Color of origin line : 3 G. Default Echomail path : C:\RG\ECHO\ H. Netmail path : C:\IM\MAIL\ I. Netmail attributes : Private Crash Kill─Sent J. UUCP gate address : 0:0/0.0 Enter selection (A─J,1─4) [Q]uit : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This option goes to the Net Addresses Menu (explained below). B Defines the default Origin line added to the bottom of new echomail bases. C Toggles stripping of IFNA kludge lines from incoming messages. D Toggles stripping of SEEN─BY lines from incoming messages. E Toggles stripping of origin lines from incoming messages. F Toggles the automatic addition of tear and origin lines to messages posted in FidoNet bases. G This is the default prefix for the Echomail directories. H Same as G above, but for Netmail bases. I This option toggles the Netmail attributes. J This option defines the UUCP gate address for Internet email. 1 Defines the color used to display normal text. (Default=0) 2 Defines the color used to display quoted text. (Default=9) 3 Defines the color used to display the tear line. (Default=4) 4 Defines the color used to display the origin line.(Default=3) ──────────────────────────── Chapter 6─H─1: Address Setup ──────────────────────────── Network addresses A. Address #0 : 1:133/1004.0 B. Address #1 : 68:7703/0.0 C. Address #2 : 93:9189/0.0 D. Address #3 : 0:0/0.0 E. Address #4 : 0:0/0.0 F. Address #5 : 0:0/0.0 G. Address #6 : 0:0/0.0 H. Address #7 : 0:0/0.0 I. Address #8 : 0:0/0.0 J. Address #9 : 0:0/0.0 K. Address #10 : 0:0/0.0 L. Address #11 : 0:0/0.0 M. Address #12 : 0:0/0.0 N. Address #13 : 0:0/0.0 O. Address #14 : 0:0/0.0 P. Address #15 : 0:0/0.0 Q. Address #16 : 0:0/0.0 R. Address #17 : 0:0/0.0 S. Address #18 : 0:0/0.0 T. Address #19 : 0:0/0.0 Enter selection (A─T) : A─T Defines your given Fido-style address. You will be prompted for each individual component of the address (zone, net, node and point numbers); pressing [ENTER] at any prompt will leave that component unchanged. ─────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─I: Offline Mail Configuration ─────────────────────────────────────── Offline Mail is a system where one computer takes messages, compresses it to a file, then you transfer it to the other computer, and it is processed. This saves time online for other people to call, and to cut down on any phone charges. ──────────────────────────────────────────────── Offline Mail Configuration A. QWK/REP Packet name :TREMERE B. Welcome screen name :C:\RG\MISC\QWK C. News file name :C:\RG\MISC\QWKNEWS D. Goodbye file name :C:\RG\MISC\QWKOUT E. Local QWK/REP path :C:\DL\ F. Ignore time for DL :On G. Max total messages :2000 H. Max msgs per base :250 I. ACS for Network .REP:% Enter selection (A─I) [Q]uit : ───────────────────────────────────────────────── A This option is what the name of the QWK packet which is created will be called (and what the reply is called.) without the QWK or REP extension. B This option is the complete path and filename (without extension) of the welcome screen in the QWK file. C This option is the complete path and filename (without extension) of the news file in the QWK file. (Note: Renegade does *not* generate a news file; you must either create it yourself, or via third party utility) D This option is the complete path and filename (without extension) of the goodbye file in the QWK file. E This option is the complete path to where you normally have your QWK files and REP files for when you want to read the BBS's messages offline with the other mail packets. If the file *.QWK already exists, the new packet will be renamed to *.QWA, then *.QWB, then *.QWC up to *.QWZ. F This option can be set if you want people to have unlimited time for downloading their mail (no matter what the time they have left, let them d/l their mail packet). G This option will set the Maximum Total number of downloadable messages. H This option will set the Maximum Total number of downloadable messages per message base. I This option will set the ACS needed to upload Network Reply packets. ───────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─J: String Configuration ───────────────────────────────── String config is where the customizable prompts, quotes, questions and text are located. ───────────────────── Chapter 6─J─1: Page 1 ───────────────────── ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── String configuration ─ page 1 of 6 A. Anonymous :Somebody B. Logon note #1:Enter your Real Name, Handle Logon note #2:or ID#: C. Logon prompt :[Node %ND] [Logon]: D. Echo chr :■ E. Your password:Password: F. Your phone # :Last 4 Phone Digits: (XXX)XXX─ G. Engage chat :%LF%PA%CL%SN chatting with %UN H. Exit chat :Chat Terminated... Press Enter To Continue I. Sysop working:[Wait] J. Pause screen :[Pause] Enter selection (A─J,[,]),(Q)uit : ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This string is what gets displayed to all users when the mail they are reading was sent anonymously. B These lines are displayed when the BBS asks for a user name, real name, user number, or NEW for a new user. C This is displayed just before the input area, and is usually a prompt such as "Logon:" that lets the caller know that the system is ready to log them on. D This is the character that is echoed to the screen when the caller types sensitive information. E This string is displayed when the user is supposed to enter their password when logging on. F This string is displayed when the user is supposed to enter their phone number when logging on. G This string is displayed when the SysOp has engaged the Chat mode. H This string is displayed when the SysOp disengages the Chat mode. I This string is displayed when the SysOp is performing a function while a user is online. J This string will be displayed when the screen is about to be scrolled off the top and Renegade wishes the user to press a key before continuing the display. ───────────────────── Chapter 6─J─2: Page 2 ───────────────────── ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── String configuration ─ page 2 of 6 A. Message entry L#1:You are entering a message with a max of %LF lines. /S save s it. B. Message entry L#2:Also, users like to be refreshed in what they said. Use /Q to quote please. C. NewScan start:Now Scanning %MB#50 D. NewScan done :─ Completed! E. New User Password:Newuser Password: F. Automessage by: :By: G. Auto border char.:─ H. Quote header L#1 :@F is quoting @T from a message wrote on I. Quote header L#2 :@D titled @S. J. Continue prompt :[Continue Y/N/C] Enter selection (A─J,[,]),(Q)uit : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This is the first line of the description for entering public messages and Email, displayed just after the header information is entered. B This is the second line of the description for entering public messages and Email. C This message is displayed at the start of each message base during a NewScan of messages. D This message is displayed at the end of each message base during a NewScan of messages. E This message is displayed when asking for the New User Password (if one is defined) F This message is displayed as the header of the AutoMessage. G This character surrounds the text in the AutoMessage above and below it. H This string is the first line that is displayed when the user quotes a message. There are four MCI codes in this string that will only work here. @D will display the date the reply was sent. @F will display who the message was sent from. @S will display the subject of the message. @T will display who the message was to. Yes, this was mentioned in the MCI code section, but it bears repeating. I This is the same as (H) except it's the 2nd line. J This is like Option (J) on Page 1 except it's a continue prompt with keys (Y)es, (N)o, and (C)ontinuous. ───────────────────── Chapter 6─J─3: Page 3 ───────────────────── ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── String configuration ─ page 3 of 6 A. Shell to DOS L#1: B. Reading email: :[%UN [%TL]%LF[Reading Email] : C. Chat call L#1 :Now Paging %SN ... D. Chat call L#2 :[BEEP] E. Shuttle prompt :[Node %ND] [Shuttle]: F. Name not found :Sorry, we have no such user under than name. G. Bulletin line :[Select a Bulletin] [#/?/Q]: H. Protocol prompt :[Select a Protocol] [#/?/Q]: I. Chat call reason:%PA%CL%SN requests that a reason be given for this chat requ est. Enter selection (A─I,[,]),(Q)uit : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This message is displayed when the SysOp has performed a shell to DOS. B This is the prompt displayed when the user is reading their private email. C This message is displayed when a user pages the SysOp for chat. D This message is displayed while the BBS is paging the SysOp during chat hours. It is displayed nine times, with a beep between each one. (A visual for the SysOp and the user that the user wants to chat.) E This line is displayed when a user is at the Shuttle Logon menu and they are to enter their name. F This message is displayed if the user name entered during the logon process is not a valid user name on the BBS. NOTE: This does not work for the shuttle menu, only regular logins. G This message is displayed below the list of the BBS bulletins. H This string is displayed when the user is about to transfer a file. It's used to find out which protocol they want to use. I This is the string that asks for the reason the user is paging the sysop. ───────────────────── Chapter 6─J─4: Page 4 ───────────────────── ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── String configuration ─ page 4 of 6 A. List line :Listing Files in %FB ─ (Press P to Pause)%LF%PA B. File NewScan line:Scan for new files... C. Search line :Search all directories for file mask. D. Find Descrip. L#1: E. Find Descrip. L#2:Enter a Text String to locate in Listings. F. Download line :Download! You have an ACCOUNT BALANCE of %AB. G. Upload line :Upload! There is %FKk bytes free on the current drive. H. View content line:Enter filename(s) to view: I. Insuff. credits :Sorry, you do not have enough credits for this function. J. Bad UL/DL ratio :Sorry! Upload/Download ratio unbalanced. Questions? Leave Feedback. Thanx! Enter selection (A─J,[,]),(Q)uit : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This message is displayed when the user selects to list files at the file transfer menu. B This message is displayed when the user selects to scan for new files. C This message is displayed when a user searches for a particular file or set of files. D This is the first line of the message that is displayed when a user wants to search for a text string in the file lists. E This is the second line of the message described in option F This message is displayed before a user enters a filename to download. G This message is displayed when a user attempts to upload a file. H This message is displayed when a user attempts to view the contents of an archive file. I This message is displayed when a user attempts to download a file that is worth more file points than they have. J This message is displayed when a user attempts to download a file when their upload/download ratio is out of balance. ───────────────────── Chapter 6─J─5: Page 5 ───────────────────── ────────────────────────────────────────────────────── String configuration ─ page 5 of 6 A. Logon incorrect :Logon incorrect. B. Get filespec L#1:[Enter]=All Files. C. Get filespec L#2:File Mask : D. Add to batch :File added to batch E. Adding batches :Enter filename(s) for addition to the batch queue. F. Reading prompt :[%MB]%LFBegin reading at [1─%HM] (Q=Quit): G. Sysop PW prompt :^0System password: ^5 H. Use defaults :Pressing <ENTER> will use the Defaults I. Newscan begins :(r)(r)(r)Initiating(r)GLOBAL»Newscan»»» J. Newscan done :(r)(r)(r)Completed(r)GLOBAL»Newscan»»» Enter selection (A─J,[,]),(Q)uit : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A This is the string that will be displayed if a user enters the incorrect password or phone number during logon. B This is the first line of the message displayed when a file search is being attempted. C This is the second line of the message displayed when a file search is being attempted. D This message is displayed when a user has added a file to the upload or download queue. E This message is displayed when the user wants to flag a file for batch downloading. F This prompt is displayed when the user starts reading messages. G This is the prompt displayed when asking for the sysop password. at login H This message is displayed when the user is entering a message. It informs the user that default statements will be used if they press [ENTER] at the prompt. I This message is displayed when the user starts a new scan of the available message areas. J This message is displayed when the new scan of message bases is done. (See option I.) ───────────────────── Chapter 6─J─6: Page 6 ───────────────────── ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── String configuration ─ page 6 of 6 A. User question #1 :What is your Mother's Maiden name? B. User question #2 :You have a ship ─ you will use it ─ What shall we call it? C. User question #3 :What is your Rank? D. User editor display #1 :Backup PW E. User editor display #2 :Ship Name F. User editor display #3 :Rank Enter selection (A─F,[,]),(Q)uit : ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A─C These strings are what the user is asked during the SysOp definable question section of the new user logon process. D─F These are the strings that are displayed in the corresponding sections of the screen in the user editor for the SysOp definable questions. ──────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K: Color Configuration ──────────────────────────────── After choosing this option, the following menu comes up: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NN:Description :Colors ==:==============================:============================ 1 Tremere 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 2 Renegade Default 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Color Scheme editor (?=Help) : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── D This will delete one of the color schemes that are available. I This will insert a color scheme into your current list. M This will modify a current color scheme, and bring you to the next menu (below). P This will set the position of a scheme in the list. Q This will quit you from the color configuration menu, and bring you back to the System Config Menu. After pressing M and choosing the scheme you wish to modify, the following menu is displayed: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Color Scheme 1 of 1 1. Description : Renegade Default 2. System colors : 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 3. File Listings 4. Message Listings 5. File Area Listings 6. Message Area Listings A. Offline Mail screen B. Private Mail Listing Edit menu (?=Help) : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 1 Changes the description of this scheme 2 Changes the different colors of the ^P color system. 3 Changes the colors in the file listing. 4 Changes the colors in the message listing. 5 Changes the colors in the file area listing. 6 Changes the colors in the message base listing. A Changes the colors in the Offline mail listing. B Changes the colors in the private mail listing. ──────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K─1: System Colors ──────────────────────────── After pressing 2, the following is shown: ──────────────────────────────────────────────── 0. System color 0: Bright White on Black 1. System color 1: White on Black 2. System color 2: Blue on Black 3. System color 3: Bright Cyan on Black 4. System color 4: Bright Blue on Black 5. System color 5: Bright Magenta on Black 6. System color 6: Bright White on Blue 7. System color 7: Magenta on Black 8. System color 8: Blinking Bright Yellow on Black 9. System color 9: Bright Black on Black System color to change : ──────────────────────────────────────────────── [1─9] Pressing any of these keys will change the system color that corresponds to the number you pressed. The available colors are displayed, then you are asked which color will be your foreground, and which will be your background. You are then asked if you want the foreground to be blinking. After you have entered your answers, you are displayed with what your selection looks like, and you're asked if it is what you wanted. ──────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K─2: File Listings ──────────────────────────── After Pressing 3 on the color scheme menu, the following menu is shown: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ┌────────────┬──────┬────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐ │ File Name │ Size │ Description MS─DOS Games #8 │ └────────────┴──────┴────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘ *RENEGADE.ZIP 351300 Latest version of Renegade! *RG .ZIP 276420 Latest RENEGADE upgrade. This is the latest upgrade available Uploaded by: John Smith (A) Border (B) File Name field (C) Pts Field (D) Size field (E) Desc Field (F) Area field (G) File name (H) File Points (I) File size (J) File desc (K) Extended (L) Status flags (M) Uploader (N) Search Match Color to change : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── [A] This key will change the color for the border. [B─F] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the listing header. [G─N] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the actual listing. (Status Flag is the *, Unvalid, etc..) After choosing what you wish to modify, the available colors are displayed, then you are asked which color will be your foreground, and which will be your background. You are then asked if you want the foreground to be blinking. After you have entered your answers, you are displayed with what your selection looks like, and you're asked if it is what you wanted. ─────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K─3: Message Listings ─────────────────────────────── After Pressing 4 on the color scheme menu, the following menu is shown: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ┌──────┬───────────────────┬────────────────────┬───────────────────┬────────┐ │ Msg# │ Sender │ Receiver │ Subject │ Posted │ └──────┴───────────────────┴────────────────────┴───────────────────┴────────┘ * 1 Herb Avore Peter Abbot Help! 01/01/93 * 2 Robin Banks Helen Beck Re: Renegade 01/01/93 > 3 Noah Zark Lou Zerr Modems 01/01/93 (A) Border (B) Msg Num field (C) Sender Field (D) Receiver field (E) Subject Field (F) Date field (G) Msg Num (H) Msg Sender (I) Msg Receiver (J) Subject (K) Msg Date (L) Status flags Color to change : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── [A] This key will change the color for the border. [B─F] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the listing header. [G─L] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the actual listing. (Status Flag is the *, Unvalid, etc..) After choosing what you wish to modify, the available colors are displayed, then you are asked which color will be your foreground, and which will be your background. You are then asked if you want the foreground to be blinking. After you have entered your answers, you are displayed with what your selection looks like, and you're asked if it is what you wanted. ───────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K─4: File Area Listings ───────────────────────────────── After Pressing 5 on the color scheme menu, the following menu is shown: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ┌─────┬────────────────────────────────┬─────┬───────────────────────────────┐ │ Num │ Name │ Num │ Name │ └─────┴────────────────────────────────┴─────┴───────────────────────────────┘ 1 ■ SysOp Directory 2 ■ Renegade: Prgrm/Docs 3 Renegade: General Utils 4 Renegade: Graphic/Bull Maker 5 Renegade: Menu Related 6 ■ Renegade: Netmail 7 ■ Frontdoor 8 ■ User Uploads 9 ■ Doors 10 ■ Doom: Prgrm/FAQs 11 ■ Doom: Editors 12 ■ Doom: WAD (Levels) 13 Doom: WAD (Sounds) 14 Doom: Dmaud Patches 15 ■ Doom: Dehacked 16 ■ Doom: Dmgraph Patches 17 ■ Doom: Local Tourney Stats 18 ■ Trade Wars 2002 Prgm/Faqs 19 ■ Trade Wars 2002 Add─Ons 20 ■ Lord: Prgm/FAQs 21 ■ Lord: Add─Ons 22 ■ Lord: Editors (A) Border (B) Base Num field (C) Base Name Field (D) Scan Indicator (E) Base Number (F) Base Name Color to change : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── [A] This key will change the color for the border. [B─C] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the listing header. [D─F] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the actual listing. (Scan Indicator is the ■ to show if you are scanning that base) After choosing what you wish to modify, the available colors are displayed, then you are asked which color will be your foreground, and which will be your background. You are then asked if you want the foreground to be blinking. After you have entered your answers, you are displayed with what your selection looks like, and you're asked if it is what you wanted. ──────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K─5: Message Area Listings ──────────────────────────────────── After Pressing 6 on the color scheme menu, the following menu is shown: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ┌─────┬────────────────────────────────┬─────┬───────────────────────────────┐ │ Num │ Name │ Num │ Name │ └─────┴────────────────────────────────┴─────┴───────────────────────────────┘ 1 ■ (r)(r)(r)US─NET»»» 2 ■ MS─DOS 3 ■ Apple 4 Macintosh 5 Commodore 6 ■ Ops─Only 7 ■ Humor 8 ■ BBS Plugs 9 ■ Ham Radio 10 ■ Debate 11 ■ Story Time 12 ■ Suggestions 13 ■ Games Galore 14 ■ Buy─Sell 15 ■ Twilight 2000 16 ■ Tradewars 2002 17 ■ Upgrades 18 ■ Reviews 19 ■ Slam 20 ■ Environmental Issues 21 ■ Programming 22 ■ Tagline Conference 23 ■ Science Fiction 24 ■ Renegade 25 ■ System Announcements 26 ■ Portland Computer 27 ■ Netbase 28 ■ Buy / Sell (UNI) 29 ■ Ham Radio (UNI) 30 ■ Hardware (UNI) 31 ■ SysOps and Moderators Conference 32 ■ User Comments Conference (UNI) 33 ■ Chit Chat (UNI) 34 ■ Local Net (A) Border (B) Base Num field (C) Base Name Field (D) Scan Indicator (E) Base Number (F) Base Name Color to change : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── [A] This key will change the color for the border. [B─C] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the listing header. [D─F] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the actual listing. (Scan Indicator is the ■ to show if you are scanning that base) After choosing what you wish to modify, the available colors are displayed, then you are asked which color will be your foreground, and which will be your background. You are then asked if you want the foreground to be blinking. After you have entered your answers, you are displayed with what your selection looks like, and you're asked if it is what you wanted. ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K─6: Offline Mail Screen ────────────────────────────────── After Pressing A on the color scheme menu, the following menu is shown: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The QWKSystem is now gathering mail. ┌─────┬───────────────────────┬─────────┬──────┬─────────┬─────┬──────┬──────┐ │ Num │ Message base name │ Short │ Echo │ Total │ New │ Your │ Size │ └─────┴───────────────────────┴─────────┴──────┴─────────┴─────┴──────┴──────┘ 1 General GENERAL No 530 328 13 103k 2 Not so General NSGEN No 854 86 15 43k 3 Vague VAGUE No 985 148 8 74k (A) Border (B) Base num field (C) Base name field (D) Short field (E) Echo field (F) Total field (G) New field (H) Your field (I) Size field (J) Title (K) Base Number (L) Base name (M) Short (N) Echo flag (O) Total Msgs (P) New Msgs (R) Your Msgs (S) Msgs size Color to change : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── [A] This key will change the color for the border. [B─I] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the listing header. [J─S] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the actual listing. (Title is the "QWK System is now ..") After choosing what you wish to modify, the available colors are displayed, then you are asked which color will be your foreground, and which will be your background. You are then asked if you want the foreground to be blinking. After you have entered your answers, you are displayed with what your selection looks like, and you're asked if it is what you wanted. ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─K─7: Private Mail Listing ─────────────────────────────────── After Pressing B on the color scheme menu, the following menu is shown: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ┌─────┬───────────────────┬────────────────────────┬──────────────────────────┐ │ Num │ Date/Time │ Sender │ Subject │ └─────┴───────────────────┴────────────────────────┴──────────────────────────┘ 1 01 Jan 1993 01:00a Izzy Backyet Renegade 1 01 Jan 1993 01:00a Rhoda Bote Upgrades (A) Border (B) Number field (C) Date/Time field (D) Sender field (E) ject field (F) Number (G) Date/Time (H) Sender (I) Subject Color to change : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── [A] This key will change the color for the border. [B─E] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the listing header. [F─I] These keys will change the color for the given letter in the actual listing. After choosing what you wish to modify, the available colors are displayed, then you are asked which color will be your foreground, and which will be your background. You are then asked if you want the foreground to be blinking. After you have entered your answers, you are displayed with what your selection looks like, and you're asked if it is what you wanted. ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─L: Archive Configuration ────────────────────────────────── Upon selecting, the following menu is displayed: ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Archive configuration edit NN:Ext:Compression cmdline :Decompression cmdline :Success Code ==:===:=========================:=========================:============ +1 ZIP pkzip %F %I PKUNZIP ─o % 0 +2 ARJ ARJ a ─y %F ARJ e /y %F 0 1. Archive comment file:C:\DLOAD\AQ.HDR 2. Archive comment file:C:\DLOAD\SYSOP.HDR 3. Archive comment file:C:\DLOAD\DOOM.HDR Archive edit (Q,?=help) : ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 1─3:Archive comments ── Allows the definition of up to three different archive comments, which can be added to archive files automatically after they have been uploaded. (I)nsert archive ── Creates a new entry in the archive format table. (D)elete archive ── Remove an entry from the archive format table. (M)odify archives ── Allows modification of the archive format table entries. (Q)uit and save ── Saves the table and returns to the System Configuration menu. The following screen is displayed after you choose an archive to work on. ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Archive #1 of 3 1. Active : Yes 2. Extension name : ZIP 3. Interior list method : "/1" ─ *Internal* ZIP viewer 4. Compression cmdline : pkzip %F %I 5. Decompression cmdline : PKUNZIP ─o %F %I 6. File testing cmdline : pkunzip ─t %F 7. Add comment cmdline : rezip.bat %F %C 8. Errorlevel for success : 0 Q. Quit Edit menu: (1─8,[,],Q) : ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The "[" and "]" keys will allow you to move back and forth between each entry in the list. 1 This option specifies whether or not the archive format is active. 2 This option specifies the extension used for files saved in the particular archive format. 3 This option defines the way the board is to view the contents of archive files in the current format. /1 ─ Uses the internal ZIP file viewer /2 ─ Uses the internal ARC file viewer /3 ─ Uses the internal ZOO file viewer /4 ─ Uses the internal LZH file viewer /5 ─ Uses the internal ARJ file viewer If you have defined an archive format that is not supported internally, use this option to define the Commandline required to view the archive's contents. 4 This option defines the command line used to create or update an archive file using this format. If this line is blank, Renegade assumes the file is compressed. This is for people who want to test things such as GIF files, while leaving the Recompress Archive flag on. Before, files would be deleted because they could not be compressed. 5 This option is similar to option 4, except that it defines the Commandline used to extract files from an archive file. All rules and restrictions mentioned above also apply. 6 This option is similar to option 4, except that it defines the Commandline needed to check the integrity of an archive file. 7 This option is similar to option 4, except that it defines the Commandline used to add a comment to an archive file. 8 This option defines the ERRORLEVEL value that the archiving program returns when an operation has been successfully completed. Most programs return a level of 0. ───────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─M: Credit Configuration ───────────────────────────────── This section defines the number of credits for use on the BBS. Upon selecting this option, the following screen is displayed: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Credit System Config A. Charge/minute :10 B. Message post :─10 C. Email sent :10 D. Free time at logon :50 E. Internet Email Cost :500 Enter selection (A─D) [Q]uit : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Option A will change the amount charged per minute. Option B changes the amount charged per message posted. Option C changes the amount charged per E─Mail sent. Option D is the amount of credits given to the user if they don't have enough to logon at the time. Option E is the cost to sent Email over the Internet ───────────────────────────── Chapter 6─N: Time Limitations ───────────────────────────── This section defines the maximum amount of time (in minutes) that a user can remain online for their particular security level (SL). Upon selecting this option, the following screen is displayed: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Editing: Time limitations 0:1 20:20 40:50 60:90 80:110 100:130 120:130 140:130 1:1 21:20 41:50 61:90 81:110 101:130 121:130 141:130 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19:10 39:40 59:80 79:100 99:120 119:130 139:130 159:130 Range settings (S)et (T)oggle (Q)uit : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── (S)et ─ Sets the SL values for a range of SL areas. You are asked to enter the starting and ending SL areas, and the new value to be placed in those spots. (T)oggle ─ Switches the display between showing SL areas 0─159 and 160─255. (Q)uit ─ Returns you to the System Configuration menu. (Just for definition, the SL is on the left, then a colon, then the time limit on the right.) ──────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─O: Call Allowances Per Day ──────────────────────────────────── This section works like the Time Limitations section except this section sets the number of calls allowed per day. ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─P: UL/DL # of Files Ratio ─────────────────────────────────── This section works like the Time Limitations section except this section sets the number of files that a user can download for every file that they upload. If set to 0, this function becomes disabled for that SL. ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─Q: UL/DL KiloBytes Ratio ────────────────────────────────── This section works like the Time Limitations section except this section sets the number of K that a user can download for every K that they upload. If set to 0, this function becomes disabled for that SL. ──────────────────────────── Chapter 6─R: Post/Call Ratio ──────────────────────────── This section works like the Time Limitations section except this section sets the number of posts per call ratio that must be kept in order to have a correct PCR. (Helpful if you want to keep people out of the File transfer section until they get productive in posting, etc..) Some people have gotten confused about this section. You want to enter the number of posts that a user of that Security Level (SL) would need for the ACS "ZZ", per 100 calls. (ie: if this was set to 25, the user would have to post 25 messages for every 100 calls they make. if they don't, they won't have ACS "ZZ", and therefore can't do anything that you have "ZZ" in.) ──────────────────────────── Chapter 6─S: Max D/L Per Day ──────────────────────────── This section works like the Time Limitations section except this section sets the # of downloadable files per day. ────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─T: Max D/L K Per Day ────────────────────────────── Same as above but Downloadable K per day. ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 6─U: Update System Averages ─────────────────────────────────── This command will update the current System Averages. This command should only be used when the stats get messed up. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 7 - User Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Upon entry to the user editor, you will see the following screen: ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Renegade User Editor [3 of 12] A. User name : SUPPORT ACCOUNT L. Security : 100 B. Real name : Support Account M. D Security: 0 C. Address : Support Account N. AR:-------------------------- D. City/State: Thompson, MB O. AC:----------/1234 E. Zip code : X0X0X0 P. Sex/Age : M94 (00/00/00) F. SysOp note: Support Account R. Phone num : 000─000─0000 G. Backup PW : Support T. Last/1st : 11/25/94 (08/30/94) H. Ship Name : Gettin' Help V. Locked out: Inactive I. Rank : Support W. Password : [Not Shown] J. Status : [DEL] [TRP OFF] [LOCK] [ALRT] X. Caller ID : K. QWK setup : ZIP Y. Start Menu: 1. Call records─ TC:9 TT:157 CT:1 TL:82 TB:0 2. Mail records─ PB:0 PV:0 FB:4 WT:0 3. File records─ DL:1─304k UL:1─171k DT:0─0k 4. Pref records─ EM:Auto CS:Yes PS:Yes CL:Yes ED:Reg 5. Subs records─ CR:5500 DB:8 BL:5492 ED:01/24/95 ET:B Select item: ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── A Alters the user's name. If the BBS allows handles, this name can be set differently from the user's real name. B Alters the user's real name. C Alters the user's address. D Alters the user's city and state/province. E Alters the user's postal zip code. F Alters the comment field if you want to be reminded of something about the user. G Alters the user's answer to the 1st SysOp Definable Question. H Alters the user's answer to the 2nd SysOp Definable Question. I Alters the user's answer to the 3rd SysOp Definable Question. J This command toggles the Status of the user: 1) This command can be set to record every action of a user from logon to logoff. 2) This command is used to turn auto─chat buffering on. 3) This command will output the users actions to a separate SysOp log specific to the user. 4) This command will alert the SysOp when the user logs on the next time. The Display next to Status doesn't display the status of Chat buffer or SysOp Log, but notifies you if the user is Deleted or if they are locked out. K Alters the configuration of the user's QWK packets. L Alters the user's security level (SL). M Alters the user's download security level (DSL). N Allows toggling of the user's AR flags. NOTE: AR Flags can get complicated. Unlike AC Flags, AR Flags are *not* predefined, you as the sysop can use them for whatever you please. This is done by ACS checking (see the Fx ACS level in Chapter 3). For example, if I want to set access to my file menu to users only with AR Flag F, I change the access on the file menu via the menu editor to read "FF" (without the quotation marks). After doing this, if a user tries access the file menu, and they do not have AR flag F toggled on, then they will be denied access to the menu. If they do have AR Flag F toggled on, they'll be allowed to access the menu. In this manner, a sysop could pick and choose who has access to the file menu simply by toggling that users flags. O Allows toggling of the user's AC flags. AC Flag Definitions: Penalty Flags - L Can logon ONLY once/day ── Does not allow a given caller to have more than one BBS logon in a given day. C Can't page SysOp ── Does not allow the caller to use the chat command throughout the BBS. V Posts marked unvalidated ── Marks all public messages as "unvalidated" until the SysOp decides to either validate or delete them. U Can't list users A Can't write a AutoMessage. This command will not allow the user to replace the current AutoMessage with one of their own. * Can't post/send anon. ── This flag prevents the caller from being able to post public or Email messages anonymously. P Can't post at all ── This flag prevents a user from posting any messages in any message base. E Can't send Email ── This flag prevents the caller from sending any Email to another user. K Can't vote ── Does not allow the caller to have access to the voting booth. M Mandatory Reply or Deletion of E─Mail. User must either read and reply to his/her mail, or delete it. Reward Flags - 1 No UL/DL ratio check ── This flag will suppress the upload/download ratio check. 2 No post/call ratio check ── This flag will suppress the post/call ratio check. 3 No file points check ── This flag will suppress the checking of a user's file points when requesting a download of a file. This flag also prevents file points from being deducted from a users balance. 4 Protection from deletion ── This flag will prevent a user's account from being deleted. P Alters the user's date of birth and gender. Q Exits the user editor. R Alters the user's telephone number. T Alters the date that the user last called the BBS. V This option allows a user to be "locked out" from the BBS; the user will not be allowed to log back on under that name or handle. You will be prompted for a lockout filename, which will be displayed to the user if they try to log on again. W Alters the user's password. NOTE: As of 4─05 Exp, all user passwords are encrypted and cannot be viewed from the user editor. They can, however, still be changed with this option. X This is where the Caller ID information is stored if Renegade is receiving it. Y Alters the starting menu for the user. (If not specified, default from System Config is used.) 1 Allows alteration of the user's calling records: Total calls Total time on Calls today Time left today Illegal logon attempts Amount of time in Time Bank 2 Allows alteration of the user's mail records: Total public posts Total private posts (Email) Total feedbacks sent Mail waiting 3 Allows alteration of the user's File records: Number of downloaded files Number of downloaded kilobytes Number of uploaded files Number of uploaded kilobytes Number of downloads today Number of downloaded kilobytes today 4 Allows alteration of the user's Preferences: Emulation Type Clear Screen Screen Pause Color Monitor Editor Type 5 Allows alteration of the user's Subscription records: Credits Debit Date of Expiration Expiration Level ; Toggles between "long" and "short" display modes. : Used to turn off the re─display of the user account records in─between commands. \ Views the contents of Slog#.Log where # is the user number. [ Allows editing of the record previous to the current one. If you are at the first record, this command will move to the last record. ] Allows editing of the record after the current one. If you are at the last record, this command will move to the first record. = This command restores the original information for the current record, if you didn't move to another record or if you didn't leave the user editor. { Searches backwards in the user file for all users matching the criteria defined in search options. } Searches forward in the user file for all users matching the criteria defined in search options. * This option will validate a user to a new security level (A─Z, set in Subscription Access). + Alters the status of the user's mailbox. If the mailbox is closed, no Email can be sent to that particular user. The question is also asked of if the mail is to be forwarded to another user. U Moves directly to another user's record. You may enter the user number, the user name, or a partial search string (the user file will be searched for every user name that contains the search string, and you will be prompted one by one). S Specifies certain criteria for searching for users. The following criteria are defined: General text ACS SL DSL AR flags AC flags Status Days since last on Days since first on Number of calls User age User gender # 1/10's call/post #k DL/1k UL # DLs/1 UL In addition, there are several commands that can be used while in this sub─menu: (L)ist options ─ List the current definitions for each option. (T)oggle options on/off ─ Toggle an option on/off. (C)lear options ─ Make all options inactive. (U)sers who match ─ List all users who match the defined criteria. (Q)uit ─ Return to the user editor. ─ This command will display the user's answers to the "Newuser" questionnaire. ^ Toggles deletion of a user's record. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 8 - File Base Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Upon entering the file base editor, a the following screen will be shown. ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NNN:File base name :Flags :ACS :UL ACS :DL ACS :Maxf ===:=========================:======:==========:==========:==========:==== 1 SysOp Directory ──N─── s255c@ d255 2000 2 Miscellaneous ────── s20c@ d20 2000 3 Apogee Programs ──N─── c@ s255 2000 4 Epic Megagames ──N─── c@ s255 2000 5 Nor'Easter Software ──N─── c@ s250 2000 6 Renegade Software ──N─── c@ s255 2000 ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── <CR>Redisplay screen ── Redisplays the listing of file bases. (D)elete ── Used to remove a file base. (I)nsert ── Used to insert another file board in your system. (M)odify ── Allows changes to be made to the file base. (P)osition ── Moves the file boards around in position. (T)oggle ── Toggles the file board editor between display modes. (Q)uit ── Exits the file base editor. When you select the (M)odify command, you will be asked which base you want to modify. After you choose the base, a screen like the following is displayed: ────────────────────────────────────── 1. Name : SysOp Directory 2. Filename : SYSOP 3. DL/UL path : F:\SYSOP\ / F:\SYSOP\ 4. ACS req'd : s255c@ 5. UL/DL ACS : / d255 6. Max files : 2000 7. Password : 8. Arc/cmt type: ZIP/1 Flags : --N---- Q. Quit Enter selection (1─8) [Q]uit : ────────────────────────────────────── 1 Allows you to rename the current file base. It stores the name as ASCII text, with a maximum of 40 characters. 2 Allows you to alter the directory filename, which stores the information on each file in the file base. 3 Allows you to reconfigure the path to which your files are uploaded and downloaded to/from. 4 This command sets the ACS settings that the user must have to access to enter the file base. 5 This command sets the ACS settings that the user must have in order to download and upload to the file base. 6 This is the maximum number of files allowed in a file base. If a user tries to upload a file when the maximum number of files is reached, the BBS will not allow the transfer. 7 This options sets a password that a user must enter correctly password to enter the base. 8 This enables file bases to be set up with different compression types and comments as defined in the archive configuration. [ Goes to the previous file base. ] Goes to the next file base. C CD-ROM Flag: This feature toggles whether of not the file base is kept on a CD─ROM or not. If toggled on, it will disallow the file base to be newscanned. Files on the CD─ROM (either Batch or Single Download) will be copied to the BBS Temporary Directory under the CD directory. They are automatically purged as they are downloaded, or when the next user logs in. D Date Uploaded Flag: This flag will show the date that the file was uploaded. F Displays the first file base. G GIFSpecs Flag: This flag is used for directories containing GIF pictures. If active, the BBS will insert in the description the size and color information about the files in the current base when the *8 CmdKey is used. It is written in the following format: (Width,Height,# of colors) Width and Height are in pixels. I In Path Flag: If toggled on, the *.DIR file for the particular file base will be stored in the download path instead of the DATA directory. J Displays the specified file base. L Displays the last file base. N No-Ratio Flag: Sets the file base to not have UL/DL ratio or file points checks. P Toggles whether or not this file base will be scanned for duplicate files. Q Exits the file base editor. S Show Uploader Flag: This flag will show the name of the user that uploaded the file. U Unhidden Flag: If active, it will display a file base in an area listing regardless of whether or not the user has access to that base. If the user lacks access, it will show in the directory list, but no base number will be shown. ────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 8─A: Configuring CD-ROM File Areas ────────────────────────────────────────── CD-ROM areas are pretty easy to configure under RG. CD's are a nice addition to any BBS. They hold over half a gig of files, and unless you play frisbee with them, leave them under heat lamps, or practice other destructive little habits, the media will probably outlive you. :) NOTE: This section will assume that any CD you're adding will have all the files in one directory. If the CD you wish to add has more than one directory of files on it, repeat these steps for each directory on on the CD. Adding a CD to your BBS begins by creating a filebase for it. Make sure the Download Path is pointing to the CD drive and the directory the files are in (ie, if your CD-ROM is drive F: and the files are in BURN, set the path to F:\BURN) As for the upload path, you have a choice to make. Obviously, you can't upload files to the CD. You can still upload files to that filebase, they'll be stored in the UL path that you define. If you don't intend on storing any files beyond what's already on the CD, then set the UL path to the same as the DL path. Press C to turn the CD-ROM flag on for the area. This is important; by turning the C flag on you're telling Renegade to copy the files off the CD and onto the local harddisk before transferring them to a remote system. I recommend this; downloading from a CD is *slow*, and if you're using a disc changer, you really do not want to the discs to change in the middle of someones download. :) It should look something like this: ──────────────────────────────────────── 1. Name : CD #1 [Online] - Renegade Source Code 2. Filename : CDROM1 3. DL/UL path : E:\RGSRC\ / E:\RGSRC\ 4. ACS req'd : s50 5. UL/DL ACS : / 6. Max files : 2000 7. Password : 8. Arc/cmt type: ZIP/1 Flags : ────C─ ──────────────────────────────────────── Next, put the CD into the drive, login, head to your file menu, change to the new filebase, and locally upload the files. Yes, this is slow. Yes, this is a pain in the ass. Yes, this can consume most of your afternoon before you realize it. Pray and hope that the files on the CD have FILE_ID.DIZ's or DESC.SDI's, otherwise you have to enter the descriptions by hand. There is an alternative. If there is a file named FILES.BBS anywhere on the CD, you can save yourself alot of pain and trouble. The FILES.BBS *should* contain the file descriptions for the files on the CD. There are several third party utilities available that can import the files and their descriptions listed in a FILES.BBS into your Renegade filebase. These individual programs will have their own documentation on how to import a FILES.BBS into your setup. You may have to do some searching to find one that works for you, however. I recommend RGMaint by Gary Hall. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 9 - Message Base Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Upon entering to the message base editor, a screen like the following will be displayed. ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NNN:Base name :Flag :ACS :Post ACS :MCI ACS :MaxM:A ===:=============================:=====:==========:==========:==========:====:= 1 General Messages L──── s20 250 N 2 MS─DOS L──── s20 100 N 3 Apple L──── s20 100 N 4 Macintosh L──── s20 100 N 5 Commodore L──── s20 100 N 6 Ops─Only L──── s20fb|s250 s20 100 N 7 Humor L──── s20 100 N 8 BBS Plugs L──── s20 100 N 9 Ham Radio L──── s20 100 N 10 Debate L──── s20 100 N ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── <CR>Redisplay screen ── Redisplays the listing of message bases. (D)elete ── Used to remove a message base. (I)nsert ── Used to insert another message base in your BBS. If you don't have Compress Base Numbers toggled on, you can have over 1,024 bases. (M)odify ── Allows changes to be made to the message base. (P)osition ── Moves the message bases around in position. (T)oggle ── Toggles the message base editor between display modes. (Q)uit ── Exits the message base editor. When you select the (M)odify command, you are asked which base you want to modify. After entering your choice, a screen like the following is shown. ────────────────────────────────────────────────── Message base #1 of 27 1. Name : General Messages 2. Filename : GENERAL 3. Base type : Local Message path: Unused 4. ACS req. : 5. Post/MCI ACS: s20 / 6. Sysop ACS : s255 7. Max Mess : 250 8. Anonymous : No 9. Password : N. Net Address : Unused C. Colors : Text=0, Quote=9, Tear=4, Origin=3 M. Mail flags : Unused O. Origin line : Unused T. Toggles : ----- P. Perm. Index : 28 Q. Quit ────────────────────────────────────────────────── 1 The name of the message base. 2 The name of the message files. 3 Designates the message base type. Three types are currently available: Local ── Allows the exchange of messages only between the users of the BBS. Echomail ── Allows the exchange of messages, via a FidoNet type message network system. QWKMail ── Adds origin lines and tear lines to messages, but does not export or add addresses. This is for use with the QWK Networking feature. When a base is defined as Echomail, you will be prompted for a disk drive message path. 4 The ACS requirements that the user must meet in order to access the message base. 5 The user must have this ACS setting in order to post messages on this base. 6 This is the ACS setting for users to have "SysOp Commands" available to them. This is helpful for BBS moderators. 7 This is the maximum number of messages that can be posted on the base. (Default is 100.) When the number of messages exceeds this limit old posts start getting removed when the base gets packed. 8 This determines the anonymity level of the message base. Available anonymity levels are: (Y)es, anonymous allowed. (N)o, anonymous not allowed. (F)orced Anonymous ── This automatically makes every post on the base anonymous. (D)ear Abby ── This is for a "Dear Abby" problem solving message base. A user may post a message under ANY one of these three possibilities: "Problemed User" ── Posted by a user who wants help, but wishes to remain anonymous. "Abby" ── Allows another user to respond to a problem post, with anonymity. User name and number ── Allows a caller to post a problem/suggestion under their handle and user number. (A)ny Name ── Allows users to post messages using any name they like. 9 When active, this will prompt a user for the password which must be entered correctly in order to access that message base. N Let's you select another node number to use if you are involved with 2 of more mail networks. C Defines the colors used for standard text, quoted text, tear, and origin lines for Echomail and Groupmail messages. M Defines the various flag settings used when tossing, scanning, and posting Echomail and Groupmail messages. The currently available flags are: K ─ Strip IFNA kludge lines. S ─ Strip SEEN─BY lines (Echomail only). O ─ Strip origin lines. T ─ Add tear and origin lines to posted messages. I ─ Sets the message base to Internet Status O Defines the origin line placed at the bottom of Echomail and Groupmail messages. Q Exits the message base editor. T Allows you to edit the base's flag set. Flag Definitions: R Real Names Flag: If active, real names are stored in the "From:" and "To:" fields of each message. U Unhidden Flag: If active, it will display a message base in an area listing regardless if the user has access to that base. If the user does not have access to the base, the name of the base will be shown without a base number. A Strip 8-bit ASCII/ANSI Flag: If active, ANSI codes and 8─bit ASCII characters (127─255) are removed from messages before they are posted. P Private Messages Flag: If active, this allows private posts to be allowed in the message base. NOTE: If a Private message is posted within an echomail base, it will still be sent out with the rest of the mail. The Private flag affects local status only. F Forced Flag: If active, this will disable the Q command, making the base a "Mandatory Reading" base to read every message. P Defines the QWK packet conference that this base is permanently assigned. Normally when created, this will be equal to the base number. If a base below this one is deleted however, the QWK replies will always be brought into this conference because of the permanent number. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 10 - Protocol Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The main screen of the protocol editor looks the following screen: ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NNN:ACS :Description ===:==========:============================================================= +0 (Q) Quit ─ abort transfer +1 (Q) Quit ─ abort batch transfer +2 (Q) Quit ─ abort resume transfer Protocol editor (?=help) : ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── <CR>Redisplay screen ── Displays the list again. (D)elete protocol ── Removes an entry from the protocol list. (I)nsert protocol ── Inserts a new entry in the protocol list. (M)odify protocol ── Allows you to change an entry in the protocol list. (P)osition protocol ── Moves an entry from one position to another. (Q)uit ── Exits the protocol editor. When you select the (M)odify command, you will be prompted for the entry number to modify. After you choose the protocol, a menu similar to the following will be displayed: ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Protocol #0 of 46 !. Type/protocl:Active ─ Single 1. Keys/descrip:"Q" / "(Q) Quit ─ abort transfer" 2. ACS required: "" 3. Temp. log : *None* 4. <U>L log : *None* <D>L log : *None* 5. <U>L command: "QUIT" <D>L command: "QUIT" 6. Codes mean :Transfer OK 7. <U>L codes :(1)"" (2)"" (3)"" (4)"" (5)"" (6)"" <D>L codes :(1)"" (2)"" (3)"" (4)"" (5)"" (6)"" E. Environ. cmd: *None* I. DL File list: *None* C. Max DOS chrs:128 P. Log position: Filename: 0 ─ Status: 0 Edit menu (?=Help): ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── <CR>Redisplay screen ── Redisplays the menu. ([)Back entry ── Moves the pointer to the previous entry in the protocol list. (])Forward entry ── Moves the pointer to the next entry in the protocol list. (J)ump to entry ── This command moves the pointer to the user specified entry in the protocol list. (F)irst entry in list ── Moves the pointer to the first entry in the protocol list. (L)ast entry in list ── Moves the pointer to the last entry in the protocol list. (Q)uit and save ── Saves the current protocol list and returns to the main protocol editor menu. In addition, you can modify any of the entries shown on the screen. They are defined as: ! This option allows you to define the type and availability of the current protocol. The available types are: Active ─ The protocol is active Batch ─ The protocol will transfer multiple files with one command. Resume ─ The protocol will transfer one file, and resume the transfer where it left off (if the previous transfer was aborted). Bi─Directional ─ The protocol will transfer files in both directions at the same time. Reliable ─ The protocol should only be available to those callers who connect with a reliable connection. (Error Correction Connect...) 1 This option defines the command keys required to select the protocol and a description that will be displayed when requested. 2 This option defines the ACS requirements that the user must have to use the protocol. 3 This option defines the name of the file that holds the result log of a file transfer operation. 4 This option defines the names of the permanent result log files for upload and download transfers. 5 This option defines the commands required to perform file uploading and downloading. When pressed, you will be asked which command (upload or download) to define. You are then asked which type of command it will be. The four different command types are as follows: (C)ommand ── The entry is assigned to a special function. Ascii ── The selected file will be transferred to the remote user via ASCII transfer. Batch ── The entry will not actually transfer a file, but instead will add the file to the batch transfer queue. Edit ── The selected file's directory entry is edited and the information can be changed. Next ── The selected file is skipped and the next file is selected. Quit ── The selection is cancelled. (E)xternal ── Allows you to define the actual DOS Commandline used with the protocol driver. Refer to the above list to determine the correct Commandline. (O)ff ── Disables that particular function for the protocol. 6 This option toggles if the error result codes defined in option 7 mean a good or bad transfer. 7 This option defines the result codes (for both uploading and downloading) returned by the protocol driver after completing transmission of a file. E This option defines the command that sets up an environment string for those programs that require environment variables to be set up in certain ways for a transfer log. For example: "SET DSZLOG=%T" would set the DSZ.COM temporary result log filename to the name defined in option 3. If no environment setup is necessary, this string should be set to NULL (""). *IMPORTANT*: If you define a command with this option, make sure to define it in your AUTOEXEC.BAT FILE! I This option defines the name of the file in which Renegade will store the filenames to be transferred in a batch transfer. C This option defines the maximum number of characters allowed on the DOS Commandline. (Default is 128, which is the normal allowable DOS size.) P This option defines the positions, on a single line of the temporary result log, of the filename and return status of the transfer. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11 - Menu Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Upon entering the Menu Editor, you are presented with a screen that looks like the following screen: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Renegade Menu Editor Directory of E:\RENEGADE\MENU\*.mnu ARCHIVE MNU AUTO MNU BATCH MNU BBSLIST MNU BYEBYE MNU EMAIL MNU FEEDBACK MNU FILE MNU GOODBYE MNU LOGON MNU MAIN MNU MESSAGE MNU MULTI MNU NETSTUF MNU OFFLINE MNU ONLINE MNU PERSONAL MNU SCANFILE MNU SCANMSG MNU SHUTTLE MNU START MNU SUBSCRIB MNU SYSOP MNU TIMEBANK MNU VOTING MNU 25 File(s) 17862656 bytes free Menu editor (?=help) : ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── (D)elete menu file ─ This command allows you to erase a menu. (I)nsert menu file ─ This command will generate a new *.MNU file. (M)odify menu file ─ This command is where you load in one of the menu files and modify the commands and information of the menu. (Q)uit ─ Exits the menu editor. When you execute the (M)odify command, you will be asked for the menu name to modify. When you enter the name of the menu, a menu like the following is displayed: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NN:KK─Typ─Options NN:KK─Typ─Options NN:KK─Typ─Options ==:====================== ==:====================== ==:====================== 1 A ─/ auto 11 E ─/ email 21 * ─/ sysop 2 B ─/ bbslist 12 N ─^ feedback 22 ! ─/ offline 3 C OC 1;Tell me about 13 O ─/ online 23 + ─Q noredist 4 F ─^ scanfile 14 P ─/ personal 24 D ─/ multi 5 G ─/ goodbye 15 S OS 25 ─ OA nothing;B 6 /G ─^ byebye 16 V ─/ voting 26 = DW xcbv 7 I OI 17 U OU 27 R ─^ subscrib 8 J OR 18 X OP 22 28 % ─^ netstuf 9 L OL 19 Y OY 10 M ─^ scanmsg 20 $ ─/ timebank Menu editor (?=help) : ? ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── In this list, "NN" is the command number, "KK" are the keys used to execute the command, "Typ" is the type of command it is, and "Options" is the command data. (D)elete command ─ Removes one of the menu commands. (I)nsert command ─ Inserts a new menu command somewhere in the menu. You can insert more than one menu command at one time. (L)ong generic menu ─ Displays how the long menu listing will look. (M)odify commands ─ This command allows you to modify the information of the different commands. (P)osition menu commands ─ This command allows you to rearrange the order of the menu commands. (S)hort generic menu ─ Shows how the short menu listing will look. (T)oggle display type ─ Toggles between the 2 formats which Renegade will use to display the menu commands on the menu: The first is shown up above; it is more concise, and takes up less space than the alternate one (which is more descriptive). (X)Menu data/command data display mode toggle ─ Toggles between the menu command list mode, and another, separate list of information about the menu. ─────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─A: Menu Command Modification ─────────────────────────────────────── When you activate the (M)odify command, you will be asked which command to modify. After you enter the command number, a menu like the following is displayed: ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Menu filename: EMAIL Command #1 of 9 1. Long descript :(R)ead Mail ─ Read private Electronic mail 2. Short descript:(R)ead Mail 3. Menu keys :R 4. ACS required :"" 5. Cmdkeys :MM 6. Options : Flags :None Q. Quit Edit menu (?=help) : ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 1 This field stores a long description of the menu command. If the menu keys are "GTITLE", this is the title. 2 This field stores a shorter description of the menu command. 3 This is the actual string that the user enters when he wants to execute the command. If the menu key is more than one character in length, and the first character of the menu key is not a slash character ("/"), the user must enter two slashes in a row ("//"), and then the rest of the command. If a command has the menu key "FIRSTCMD", they will be executed first, before the user is able to enter any commands. If a command has the menu key "EVERYTIME", the command will be executed everytime the prompt is displayed, and after the menu is displayed to non─expert mode users. If a command has the menu key "GTITLE", the line in Long Description is displayed as another title. If a command has the menu key "ENTER", the key to access the command will be the enter key. If a command has the menu key " " (space), the key to access the command will be the spacebar. If a command has the menu key UP─ARROW, DOWN─ARROW, LEFT─ARROW, or RIGHT─ARROW, the key to access the command will be the corresponding cursor key for menus that trap local and remote cursor key movement. 4 This is the ACS requirement that the user must satisfy to use or see the command. 5 This is the type of command to be executed. A full description of all the possible types commands is in Chapter 11─D. If you have "GTITLE" as the ACS, leave this blank. 6 This string contains command─particular information. If the command uses this line, a short description is with the command in Chapter 11─D. If you have "GTITLE" as the ACS, this line is the color set for the options after the title. (Bracket Color;Command Color;Description Color. (ie: 4;0;5), see description of this in Chapter 11─B) [ Displays the previous menu command. ] Displays the next menu command. F Displays the first menu command. J Displays the specified menu command. L Displays the last menu command. Flags: (C)lear screen before menu ─ This tells Renegade to clear the screen every time the normal menu is displayed. (D)on't center the menu titles ─ This tells Renegade to leave the menu titles uncentered. This only affects the titles at the top. (N)o menu prompt toggle ─ This can be used if you want to put the menu prompt for the menu in the .ASC or .ANS file. (P)Force pause before menu display ─ The screen will be paused before the menu is displayed. (T)Auto─time display toggle ─ If this is set to on, a "time─left" string will be inserted right before the menu prompt. (Most people use the @V MCI command to insert a HH:MM:SS type format time left string in their menu─prompt.) ─────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─B: Menu Information Modification ─────────────────────────────────────────── When you press the "X" key at the main editor menu, you switch the display to show the other menu information: ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Menu filename: MAIN 1. Menu titles :─=≡ Renegade BBS ≡=─ Menu title #2 :── Main Menu ── 2. Help files :MAIN / *Generic* 3. Menu Prompt :[@1 ─ @2]@MTime Left: [@V] (?=Help)@MMain Menu : ([@ ─ General BBSing] Time Left: [01:00:00] (?=Help) Main Menu : ) 4. ACS required :"" 5. Password :*None* 6. Fallback menu :MAIN 7. Forced ?─level:None 8. Generic info :4 cols ─ 4/0/5 9. Flags :C───T───── Q. Quit Menu editor (?=help) : ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 1 This field contains the title(s) of the current menu. 2 This command inputs the filenames which make up the menus of your menu system. The generic menus are specified if you set the strings to null. The first filename is the normal menu display, and the second filename is the longer menu display. If a "@S" occurs in either of these two filenames, it is replaced with the current user's SL. 3 This field contains the menu prompt that is displayed before it will accept commands from the user. It can be up to 120 characters long. 4 This is the ACS requirement that the user must have to use the menu. If the user does not have access, they will be sent to the fallback menu. 5 If a menu has a password attached to it and a user attempts to enter the menu, the menu will ask for the password. If the entered password is incorrect, the user is sent to the fallback menu. 6 This is a legal menu file which is loaded whenever the user does not have access to the current menu or if a menu error occurs. 7 The help level setting that is forced when the user enters the menu. The help levels are: 0 ── No help level forcing. 1 ── Expert level (only the prompt is shown). 2 ── Normal level (the short menu is displayed). 3 ── Novice level (the long menu is displayed). 8 This entry includes all the information that is used to generate the generic menus. C. Generic columns :4 How many columns of commands there are. 1. Bracket color :1 The color of the bracket around the command letter. 2. Command color :9 The color of the command letter inside the brackets. 3. Description color:1 The color of the description of the command. S. Show menu Shows the short generic menu. 9 There are several functions for each menu that may be flagged on or off: (C)lear screen (D)on't center titles (N)o menu prompt (P)ause before display (T)ime display (F)orce line input (1) No ANS prompt (2) No AVT prompt (3) No RIP prompt (4) No Global Disp (5) No global use C: Toggles clearing of the screen before menu display. D: Toggles if the menu titles will get centered. N: Toggles if the menu prompt is displayed. P: Toggles if there is a pause before the menu is displayed. T: Toggles the generic Time Left prompt. F: Toggles if hotkeys are allowed or not. 1: Toggles Menu Prompt for ANSI Users. 2: Toggles Menu Prompt for AVATAR Users. 3: Toggles Menu Prompt for RIP Users. 4: Toggles whether or not the global menu commands are displayed in current menu. 5: Toggles whether or not the global commands are available for this menu. ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─C: Linking Menu Commands ─────────────────────────────────── When a user activates a menu command, Renegade executes all of the commands which have the command letters which were entered by the user. If two different commands both have the same command letters in them, both commands are executed in the order they are in the menu. When linking commands together, remember to put a description only on the first command in the link, and set the rest to null. This stops Renegade from displaying the command several times on the generic menu. ───────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D: Menu System Commands (Command Keys) ───────────────────────────────────────────────── The Command Key (CmdKey)'s are 2 letter codes which make Renegade do a certain function. (<> means Optional, [] means required, {} means pick one. None means there is no Option available for that command.) ───────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─1 Offline Mail Menu Commands ───────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "!D" Function: Download .QWK packet Option : None Cmdkeys : "!P" Function: Set Message Pointers Option : None Cmdkeys : "!U" Function: Upload .REP packet Option : None ──────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─2 Timebank Command Keys ──────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "$D" Function: Deposit Time into Timebank Option : <Maxperday;Max Size of bank> Cmdkeys : "$W" Function: Withdraw Time from Timebank Option : <Maxperday> NOTE: Maxperday and Size of Bank are in minutes ─────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─3 Sysop Functions Command Keys ─────────────────────────────────────────── NOTE: Each of the commands in this section are recommended for Sysop use only. If Sysop Password Checking is turned on, all of these commands will prompt for the sysop password prior to execution. Some of these can do damage to your system if used improperly. Cmdkeys : "*B" Function: Enter the message base editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*C" Function: Change to a different user's account Option : None Cmdkeys : "*D" Function: Enter the Mini─DOS environment Option : None Cmdkeys : "*E" Function: Enter the event editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*F" Function: Enter the file base editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*L" Function: Show SysOp Log for certain day Option : None Cmdkeys : "*N" Function: Edit a text file Option : None Cmdkeys : "*P" Function: Enter the system configuration editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*R" Function: Enter Conference Editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*U" Function: Enter user editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*V" Function: Enter the voting editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*X" Function: Enter the protocol editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*Z" Function: Displays system activity log Option : None Cmdkeys : "*1" Function: Edit file(s) in current file base Option : None Cmdkeys : "*2" Function: Sort files in all file bases by name Option : None Cmdkeys : "*3" Function: Read all users' private mail Option : None Cmdkeys : "*4" Function: Download a file from anywhere on your computer Option : <filespec> If [filespec] does not exist, the user is prompted for a file to download. Cmdkeys : "*5" Function: Recheck files in current or all directories for size and online status Option : None NOTE: As of 4─05 Exp, this CmdKey also asks if you'd like to reimport the file descriptions. Cmdkeys : "*6" Function: Upload file(s) not in file lists Option : None This command allows you to upload every file that is not currently in the Renegade file lists, but is in the directory. It will display filename, file size, and then prompt for a description. If it is an archived file, and you have description importing turned on, it will search for FILE─ID.DIZ or DESC.SDI. If neither is found, then it will ask for a description. Cmdkeys : "*7" Function: Validate files Option : None File Validation Types - Manual : Manual Validation brings up the file editing Menu for each unvalidated file. You can alter any of it's information, move it to another filebase, validate it, or delete it. Automatic : Automatic Validation will search all of your filebases for unvalidated files and validate them where they are found without any prompting. Point Entry : This validation type will search your files bases for all unvalidated files, prompt you for the amount of credits you want to charge users for downloading the file, and then prompts you for how many credits to award the uploader. This is useful only to systems running on a file point system. Cmdkeys : "*8" Function: Add specs to all *.GIF files in current file base Option : None The specs are a description in the format "(XXXxYYY,CCC)", where "XXX" is the X─resolution, "YYY" is the Y─resolution, and "CCC" is the number of colors in the palette. Cmdkeys : "*9" Function: Pack the message bases Option : None Cmdkeys : "*#" Function: Enter the menu editor Option : None Cmdkeys : "*$" Function: Gives a long DOS directory of the current file base Option : None Cmdkeys : "*%" Function: Gives a condensed DOS directory of the current file base Option : None ──────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─4 Miscellanous Command Keys ──────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "─C" Function: Display message on SysOp Window Option : <string> NOTE: If the Sysop Window is not active, then this option does nothing. Cmdkeys : "─F" Function: Display a text file Option : [filename] <.ext> [filename] Full path and 8─character DOS filename. <.ext> Optional DOS extension. If no <path> is given, the file is assumed to be located in the DATA directory. If no <.ext> is given, Renegade will look for the standard extensions. MCI Codes are allowed here, so, for example, you can display different ANSI files for different message bases. Cmdkeys : "─L" Function: Display a line of text Option : [string] NOTE: As of Renegade v98-101b, Renegade no longer appends or prepends a carriage return or line feed. Cmdkeys : "─N" Function: Shows question, displays quote if Y is pressed, and continues execution of Menu Keys if N is pressed. (Yes/No Question) Option : [question;quote] Cmdkeys : "─Q" Function: Read an Infoform questionnaire file (answers in .ASW) Option : <Infoform questionnaire filename> If the Option is "", the filename is prompted for. Cmdkeys : "─R" Function: Read an Infoform questionnaire answer file Option : <Infoform questionnaire filename> If the Option is "", the filename is prompted for. Cmdkeys : "─S" Function: Append line to SysOp log file Option : [string] Cmdkeys : "─Y" Function: Shows question, displays quote if N is pressed, and continues execution of Menu Keys if Y is pressed. (Yes/No Question) Option : [question;quote] Cmdkeys : "─;" Function: Execute macro Option : [macro] This command will enter [macro] into the user's macro buffer. Any ";"'s in the [macro] string are substituted with a <CR>. Cmdkeys : "─$" Function: Prompt for password Option : [password] < <[;prompt]> [;bad─message] > This command first displays [prompt] if it exists. If it doesn't, ":" will be displayed. If the password is entered incorrectly, [bad─message] will be displayed if it exists. (If entered incorrectly, any further linking is terminated.) [password] *must* be uppercase. Cmdkeys : "─^" Function: Goto menu Option : [menu file] Cmdkeys : "─/" Function: Gosub menu Option : [menu file] Cmdkeys : "─\" Function: Return from menu Option : None ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─5 Archive Command Keys ─────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "AA" Function: Add files to archive Option : None Cmdkeys : "AC" Function: Convert between archive formats Option : None Cmdkeys : "AE" Function: Extract files from archive Option : None Cmdkeys : "AG" Function: Manipulate files extracted from archives Option : None Cmdkeys : "AM" Function: Modify comment fields in archive Option : None Cmdkeys : "AR" Function: Re─archive archived files using same format Option : None Cmdkeys : "AT" Function: Run integrity test on archive file Option : None ─────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─6 Batch File Transfer Command Keys ─────────────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "BC" Function: Clear batch queue Option : <U> U = If U is entered as the option, the upload batch queue is used. If the option is blank, then the download queue is used. Cmdkeys : "BD" Function: Download batch queue Option : None Cmdkeys : "BL" Function: List batch queue Option : <U> U = If U is entered as the option, the upload batch queue is used. If the option is blank, then the download queue is used. Cmdkeys : "BR" Function: Remove single file from batch queue Option : <U> U = If U is entered as the option, the upload batch queue is used. If the option is blank, then the download queue is used. Cmdkeys : "BU" Function: Upload batch queue Option : None Cmdkeys : "B?" Function: Display number of files left in batch download queue Option : None ──────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─7 Dropfile Command Keys ──────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "DC" Function: Create CHAIN.TXT (WWIV door) and execute Option Option : [command to execute] Cmdkeys : "DD" Function: Create DORINFO1.DEF (RBBS door) and execute Option Option : [command to execute] Cmdkeys : "DG" Function: Create DOOR.SYS (GAP door) and execute Option Option : [command to execute] Cmdkeys : "DP" Function: Create PCBOARD.SYS (PCBoard door) and execute Option Option : [command to execute] Cmdkeys : "DS" Function: Create SFDOORS.DAT (Spitfire door) and execute Option Option : [command to execute] Cmdkeys : "DW" Function: Create CALLINFO.BBS (Wildcat! door) and execute Option Option : [command to execute] Cmdkeys : "D─" Function: Execute Option without creating a door information file Option : [command to execute] NOTE: It is possible to make the dropfile output the users real name instead of their handle. This is done by adding R; before the command to execute on the option line. ─────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─8 File System Command Keys ─────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "FA" Function: Change file bases Option : <base#> or {+/─} or <L> If Option = "base#" Change to specified base. If Option = "+" Change to next base If Option = "─" Change to previous base If Option = "L" Lists available bases only If Option = "" Prompts for desired base Cmdkeys : "FB" Function: Add file to Batch Download List Option : < Filename > Filename must already exist in the file areas. The option simply bypasses the question for a filename. Cmdkeys : "FD" Function: Download file on BBS to user Option : < Filename > Filename must already exist in the file areas. The option simply bypasses the question for a filename. If the Sysop is logged in locally, Renegade will prompt for a path to copy the file to. Cmdkeys : "FF" Function: Search all file bases for description Option : None Cmdkeys : "FL" Function: List filespec in current file base only Option : Filespec (Overrides user input) Cmdkeys : "FN" Function: Scan file sections for new files Option : <newtype> <newtype> "G" : Global ─ NewScan all file bases "C" : Current ─ NewScan current file base # : Any ─ NewScan file base # "" : Ask ─ NewScan current file base (default) Cmdkeys : "FP" Function: Change pointer date for new files Option : None Cmdkeys : "FS" Function: Search all file bases for filespec Option : None Cmdkeys : "FU" Function: Upload file from user to BBS Option : None Cmdkeys : "FV" Function: List contents of an archived file Option : None Cmdkeys : "FZ" Function: Set file bases to be scanned for new files Option : None Cmdkeys : "F@" Function: Create temporary directory Option : None If there is enough file base space left, this command prompts for a directory and creates a new, temporary, file base. After changing to a new area, it disappears, and will not show up on any list. Cmdkeys : "F#" Function: Display Line/Quick file base change Option : None Displays the line "Enter the number of a file base to change to." if the user enters "#", or will switch to file base # if it exists. ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─9 Hangup Command Keys ────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "HC" Function: Careful logoff of user Option : [string] [string] is printed, and the user must enter either Yes or No. If Yes is entered, LOGOFF.* is displayed and the user is logged off. Cmdkeys : "HI" Function: Immediate logoff of user Option : None Cmdkeys : "HM" Function: Display string and logoff user Option : [string] ─────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─10 Message System Command Keys ─────────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "MA" Function: Message base change Option : <base#> or {+/─} or <L> If Option = "base#" Change to specified base. If a menu is specified, that menu is loaded if it exists. If Option = "+" Change to next base If Option = "─" Change to previous base If Option = "L" Lists available bases only If Option = "" Prompts for desired base Cmdkeys : "ME" Function: Send private mail to user Option : <User #> <;Reason> If Option is blank, this command will prompt for a user name or number to send private mail to. Mail is sent to <user #> if it specifies a valid user number. If <reason> is specified, it is used as a "RE:" reason in the letter sent. If <reason> is not specified, the default reason is "Feedback". Cmdkeys : "MK" Function: Edit/Delete outgoing private mail Option : None Cmdkeys : "ML" Function: Send "mass mail" ─ private mail sent to multiple users Option : None Cmdkeys : "MM" Function: Read private mail Option : None Cmdkeys : "MN" Function: Display new messages Option : <newtype> <newtype> "G" : Global ─ NewScan all message bases "C" : Current ─ NewScan current message base "#" : Any ─ NewScan message base # "" : Ask ─ NewScan current message base (default) Cmdkeys : "MP" Function: Post message in the current message base. Option : None Cmdkeys : "MR" Function: Read messages in current base Option : None Allows users to read messages in current base in forward or reverse order. Cmdkeys : "MS" Function: Scan messages in current base Option : <newtype> <newtype> "G" : Global ─ NewScan all message bases "Y" : Current ─ NewScan current message base "N" : NewScan ─ NewScan all bases for in new messages "" : Ask ─ NewScan current message base (default) Cmdkeys : "MU" Function: Lists users with access to the current message base Option : None Cmdkeys : "MY" Function: Scan message bases for personal messages Option : None Cmdkeys : "MZ" Function: Set message bases to be scanned for new messages Option : None Cmdkeys : "M#" Function: Display Line/Quick message base change Option : None Displays the line "Enter the number of a message base to change to." if the user enters "#", or will switch to message base # if it exists. ──────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─11 Multinode Functions Command Keys ──────────────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "NA" Function: Toggle node page availability Option : None Cmdkeys : "ND" Function: Hangup node Option : <Node #> If Option is null, user is prompted for the node # to hangup, otherwise Node # is hung up. Cmdkeys : "NG" Function: Join Group Chat Option : None Cmdkeys : "NO" Function: View users on all nodes Option : None Cmdkeys : "NP" Function: Page another node for chat Option : <Node #> If Option is null, user is prompted for node to page, otherwise Node # is paged for chat. Cmdkeys : "NS" Function: Send a message to another node Option : <node number> <;message to send> If no options are specified, the current user will be prompted for the node to send the message to, and the message to send that node. If the option is 0, the message will be sent to all active nodes. Cmdkeys : "NT" Function: Stealth Mode On/Off Option : None Cmdkeys : "NW" Function: Display String under Activity in Node Listing Option : [ String ] ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─12 Other Command Keys ────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "O1" Function: Logon to BBS (Shuttle) Option : None This command is used when the shuttle login is in effect. It will allow any validated user past, but deny access to any Unvalidated users. It is only valid when the Shuttle Menu is turned on. Cmdkeys : "O2" Function: Apply to BBS as a new user (Shuttle) Option : None This command allows the user to apply to the BBS as a new user. This CmdKey is only valid when the Shuttle Menu is turned on. Cmdkeys : "OA" Function: Allow auto─validation of users Option : [password]<;Level> New users must enter the <password> in order to validate themselves. If correct, the command sets the user to Security Level <Level>. If <Level> isn't specified, the user is upgraded to Level B. Cmdkeys : "OB" Function: Add entry to the BBS list Option : <bbslist file> If entered, the bbslist file is the alternate file to add the entry to. Default is "bbslist.bbs". Cmdkeys : "OC" Function: Page the SysOp Option : <user #> <;string> user # If the SysOp is not available, this is the user number the message is left to. string String to print, other than the why do you want to chat string. Cmdkeys : "OE" Function: Pause Screen Option : None Cmdkeys : "OF" Function: AR flag set/reset/toggle Option : [{function}{flag}] {flag} is a any AR flag (ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ) {function} may be one of the following: + Set flag ─ Reset flag ! Toggle flag More than one combination may be specified. Case is ignored. Cmdkeys : "OG" Function: AC flag set/reset/toggle Option : [{function}{flag}] {flag} is a AC flag (LCVUA*PEKM1234) {function} may be one of the following: + Set flag ─ Reset flag ! Toggle flag More than one function/flag combination may be specified. Case is ignored. Cmdkeys : "OL" Function: List today's callers Option : filename filename ─ the base filename to use for the configurable header, middle, and trailer display files. i.e. if the option is KEWL, then the callers listing will use KEWLH, KEWLM, and KEWLT instead of the default LASTH, LASTM, and LASTT Cmdkeys : "ON" Function: Clear Screen Option : None Cmdkeys : "OP" Function: Modify user information Option : [info type] [info type] Contains the type of user information to be modified. Flg Flg # 1. Address 14. Zip Code # 2. Age/DOB 15. Mail box status $ 3. ANSI type 16. Video emulation mode # 4. City & State 17. Color (toggle) # 5. Sysop Definable Question #1 18. Pause (toggle) # 6. Sysop Definable Question #2 19. Input type (toggle) # 7. Handle 20. Clear Screen (toggle) 8. Phone number 21. Define user colors 9. Password 22. Expert mode (toggle) # 10. Real Name # 23. Country 11. Screen size 24. Clear & Pause (question) # 12. Sex (gender) 26. FullScreen Editor Toggle # 13. Sysop Definable Question #3 27. Configure QWK Packet Flag Definitions: $ ─ Not recommended for use at all. Use types 16 and 17 for ANSI type modification ─ this command is the one used during a new user logon. # ─ Recommended for the NEWINFO.MNU menu only. Cmdkeys : "OR" Function: Change to another conference Option : <conference char> or <?> The <conference char> can be any character from A to Z, or @ to switch to the main conference. If Option is "?", all conferences available to the user are displayed. If Option is blank (""), the user is prompted as to which conference is desired. Cmdkeys : "OS" Function: Go to bulletins menu Option : <main bulletin;sub─bulletin> <main bulletin> is the bulletin displayed first, and after a "?" is pressed. <sub─bulletin> is the file prefix used for bulletin selections. Example: If <sub─bulletin> is MAIN, and the user enters "5", MAIN5.* is displayed. If Option="", <main bulletin> is set to "BULLETIN" and <sub─bulletin> is set to "BULLET". This is the default when bulletins are included at logon. Cmdkeys : "OU" Function: User Listing Option : < ACS;filename > ACS ─ If this is defined, the user list will only show users of this access level filename ─ this is the name of the configurable header, middle and trailer files to use. i.e. if filename=KEWL, KEWLH, KEWLM, and KEWLT will be used instead of the defaults. Cmdkeys : "OV" Function: BBS Listing Option : <filename> filename ─ the name of the file or BBSlist to display. Defaults to BBSLIST.BBS if undefined. ──────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─13 Automessage Command Keys ──────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "UA" Function: Reply to author of current AutoMessage Option : None Cmdkeys : "UR" Function: Display current AutoMessage Option : None Cmdkeys : "UW" Function: Write AutoMessage Option : None ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─14 Voting Command Keys ─────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "VA" Function: Add voting topic Option : None Cmdkeys : "VL" Function: List voting topics Option : None Cmdkeys : "VR" Function: View results of voting topic Option : <Question #> If Option is set to null, user is prompted for Question to view the results of, otherwise user views results of Question #. Cmdkeys : "VT" Function: Track User's vote Option : <User #> If Option is set to null, user is prompted for user to track, otherwise user tracks User #. Cmdkeys : "VU" Function: View users who voted on Question Option : <Question #> If Option is set to null, user is prompted for Question to view, otherwise user views Question #. This doesn't list users who have voted on the question, rather it lists the choices in the question and the users who voted that way. Cmdkeys : "VV" Function: Vote on all un─voted topics Option : None Cmdkeys : "V#" Function: Vote on Question # Option : <Question #> If Option is set to null, user is prompted for Question to vote on, otherwise user votes on Question #. ────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─15 Credit System Command Keys ────────────────────────────────────────── Cmdkeys : "$+" Function: Increase a user's credit Option : [ Amount ] Cmdkeys : "$─ Function: Increase a user's debit Option : [ Amount ] ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─16 File Scanning Command Keys (FILEP.MNU) ─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NOTE: The CmdKeys in this section must only be used on the FILEP.MNU. If they are used elsewhere, unknown results will occur. You have been warned. Cmdkeys : "L1" Function: Continue Listing Option : None Cmdkeys : "L2" Function: Quit Listing Option : None Cmdkeys : "L3" Function: Next file base Option : None Cmdkeys : "L4" Function: Toggle NewScan of that base on/off Option : None ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 11─D─17 Message Scanning Command Keys (READP.MNU) ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NOTE: The CmdKeys in this section must only be used on the READP.MNU. If they are used elsewhere, unknown results will occur. You have been warned. Cmdkeys : "RA" Function: Read Message Again Option : None Cmdkeys : "RB" Function: Move Back in Thread Option : None Cmdkeys : "RC" Function: Continuous Reading Option : None Cmdkeys : "RD" Function: Delete Message Option : None Cmdkeys : "RE" Function: Edit Message Option : None NOTE: Only the original poster and those with Message Sysop Access to that particular message base, or those with Sysop access can use this command. Cmdkeys : "RF" Function: Forward in Thread Option : None Cmdkeys : "RG" Function: Goto next Base Option : None Cmdkeys : "RH" Function: Set Highread Pointer Option : None Cmdkeys : "RI" Function: Ignore remaining messages, and set high pointer Option : None Cmdkeys : "RL" Function: List Messages Option : None Cmdkeys : "RM" Function: Move Message Option : None Cmdkeys : "RN" Function: Next Message Option : None Cmdkeys : "RQ" Function: Quit Reading Option : None Cmdkeys : "RR" Function: Reply to Message Option : None Cmdkeys : "RT" Function: Toggle NewScan of Message Base Option : None Cmdkeys : "RU" Function: Edit User of Current Message Option : None Cmdkeys : "RX" Function: Extract Message Option : None Cmdkeys : "R#" Function: Allows User to Jump to message inputed. Option : None NOTE: Do *not* define a menukey for this command. The number of the message is considered the menu key, so make sure the Menu Key option in the Menu Editor when using this command is blank. Cmdkeys : "R─" Function: Read Previous Message Option : None ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 12 - Event Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Upon entering the event editor, a screen as follows appears: ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── NN:Description :Typ:Bsy:Time :Len:Days :Execinfo ==:==============================:===:===:=====:===:=======:============ +1 Pack Messages Pak 0 00:00 292 SMTWTFS pack Event editor (?=help) : ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── <CR>Redisplay menu ── Redisplays the listing of events. (D)elete ── This will allow you to delete an unwanted event. (I)nsert ── This will insert another event into the list. (M)odify ── This will allow you to modify an existing event. (P)osition ── This will move an event from one position to another. (Q)uit ── Exits the Event Editor. When you select the (M)odify command, you are asked to select the event that you would like to modify. After choosing, the event data is displayed: ─────────────────────────────── Event #1 of 8 !. Active : Yes 1. Description : Pack Messages 2. Sched. type : Pack msgs 3. Event data : pack 4. Off hook time: None. 5. Exec. time : 00:00 6. Busy during : Yes 7. Soft event : Yes 8. Run if missed: Yes 9. Last day exec: Today A. Days active : SMTWTFS B. Node number : 0 Edit menu (?=help) : ─────────────────────────────── ! This determines whether or not the event is active. 1 This describes the event. (Up to 80 characters) 2 This is the type of event that will be executed. There are six choices: ACS ── Enables only certain callers who have the correct security settings to access the BBS at a certain time of the day. Chat ── Not implemented yet. DOS ── Shells to the DOS level and executes files defined in the Event Data. External ── This requires a batch file for execution, which is used to detect an ERRORLEVEL value. Pack ── This event packs the message bases by removing all deleted messages and adjusting the number of messages in each base to conform to the maximum limit set in the message base editor. Sort ── This event sorts the file bases by scanning the directories and sorting by name. 3 This field will vary with the type of event being executed. DOS ── The name of the program to be run. External ── The ERRORLEVEL value to be used when the BBS quits to DOS. ACS ── The ACS setting that users must have. All others ── Not used; the event data field will be ignored. 4 This is the time before an event that the BBS will become busy. If a user is online, their online time is adjusted for the event. 5 This is the time of day that the particular scheduled event will occur. It is defined in the 24─hour format. 6 This field determines whether or not the modem will be made busy during the scheduled event. 7 This tells if the event is "Hard" or "Soft". Hard events will make Renegade shorten a user's time online if it will keep them on longer then when the event will run. Soft events wait for the user to logoff before the event is run. 8 This field determines if the BBS should run the event if it missed it the last time it was supposed to be run. 9 This field sets the number of days since the event was last run. A These are the days of either the regular week, or the month, that the scheduled event will occur. Weekly ── Event will occur at least once every week. A bar with the current days active will be displayed as follows: Current: SMTWTFS [ ] Modify by entering "X"'s under the days the event is to be active. Monthly ── This will occur only one day in the month, and is modified by entering the day it is to be run. B This field determines which node will run the event. 0 means the first free node will run it. [ This will jump back one entry in the list of events. ] This will move forward one entry in the list of events. F This will move to the first entry in the list of events. L This will move to the last entry in the list of events. J This will jump to a specified entry in the list of events. Q Saves all entries in the list of events and returns to the main editor screen. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 13 - Voting Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The Voting Editor allows you to edit, insert, or delete the BBS's voting topics. ┌─────┬─────┬─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┐ │ Num │Votes│ Choice │ └─────┴─────┴─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────┘ 1 0 Do you zip then fasten, or fasten then zip? <CR>Redisplay screen (D)elete topic (A)dd topic (M)odify topic (Q)uit <CR> As it says, redisplays the screen D Prompts for a voting topic number, and then deletes that topic. A Adds a Voting Topic, as per the VA CmdKey (See Chapter 11-D-14) Q Quits Back to the WFC Screen, or Sysop Menu E Prompts for a topic to edit, then brings up the following display: Voting topic #1 of 1 1. Topic : Do you zip then fasten, or fasten then zip? 2. Creator : Adrian Blood 3. ACS to vote : "VV" 4. ACS to add : "VV" 5. # of votes : 0 # of choices : 2 6. Reset voting 7. Edit choices 8. Add a choice Q. Quit 1 This will alter the voting topic 2 This will alter the username of who created the topic 3 A user must meet the ACS defined here in order to vote on the topic. 4 A user must meet the ACS defined here in order to add a choice to the topic. 5 This option will change the # of Votes being reported for this topic. 6 This will clear all voting results for this topic 7 This option allows the editing of the individual voting choices 8 This adds a voting choice Q Rather obvious, don't you think? :) ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 14 - Conference Editor ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The Conference Editor allows you to add, edit, or delete conferences from the BBS. N:Title :ACS =:========================================:==================== @ General ^ <CR>Redisplay screen (I)nsert conference (M)odify conference (D)elete conference (Q)uit <CR> As it says, redisplays the screen D Deletes a Conference from the System I Adds a conference to the system. Valid choices are A-Z and @. You will be asked for the name of the conference, and an ACS level for the conference. M Allows you to edit the values of any of the defined conferences. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 15 - Mini-DOS Environment ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Mini─DOS is a small, compact version of the DOS Commandline. When you enter this area, you will see something like: E:\RENEGADE> where E:\RENEGADE is your BBS Home directory. The commands available here are: CD Normal DOS Change Directory Command CLS Normal DOS Clear Screen Command CONVERT This command will convert an archived file to another archive format. The proper format for the command is: CONVERT FILENAME.EXT XTN where FILENAME.EXT is the full drive:\path\filename with the correct archive extension of the archive you want to convert (ie: RENEGADE.ZIP). XTN is the archive extension that you want to convert the original file to (ie: ARJ). The archive type you want to convert to must be defined in the Archive Configuration. COPY Normal DOS Copy Command. DEL Normal DOS Delete Command. DIR This command will provide a short DOS directory. The use is the same as the normal DOS Directory Command. DIRSIZE This command will provide the amount of space that a given filetype takes up. The usage is: DIRSIZE FILETYPE[.EXT] FILETYPE is a valid DOS filename, EXT is an optional extension. Wildcards are allowed. "DIRSIZE *.ZIP" shows the total size of all the ZIP files, while "DIRSIZE *" will show the total size of all the files that don't have an extension. DISKFREE This command will show the amount of space free on the current drive. EDIT This command will pop up the old Renegade Editor, which is not unlike the DOS command EDLIN. If no file is specified, the file is then asked for. EXT This command will allow the command after it (ie: EXT DIR) to pass to DOS directly, not relying on MiniDOS. Be very careful of who has access to MiniDOS. Anyone can use this command to format your harddrive, deltree your root directory, or run a virus they've just uploaded. EXIT Normal DOS EXIT Command which will return you to Renegade. HELP or ? This command will up the DOSHELP.* file as a Help me file. MD Normal DOS Make Directory Command. MOVE This command will copy a file or a group of files and then will delete the original files. The proper format for this command is: MOVE FILESPEC.EXT DESTINATION RD Normal DOS Remove Directory Command. RECEIVE This command will tell Renegade to receive a file from the remote computer. The full command is just "RECEIVE". After pressing enter, Renegade will prompt for a protocol, and if the protocol is a non─batch protocol, Renegade will prompt for a filename. REN Normal DOS Rename File Command. SEND This command is the opposite of receive, as it will allow the remote computer to receive a file that is sent from Renegade. No filespecs are required for the command. The filename is asked for and then the protocol. TYPE Normal DOS Type Command. (If in Renegade, you have a page pause, the file you are typing will be paused.) UNZIP This command will extract the files from an archive file (Not just ZIP files, any archive type defined in the Archive Configuration can be extracted with this command). The proper format for this command is: UNZIP FILENAME.EXT [OPTIONAL] FILENAME.EXE is the FULL path and filename with extension of the archive. [OPTIONAL] is any optional information that should be passed to the Un─Archiver, such as destination, file to extract, etc. VER This command will just notify you that you are in the Renegade DOS Emulator. VIEW This command will use the Renegade Internal File lister and will list the files inside an archive. The proper use for this command is: INF FILENAME VIEW will search for wildcards for the extension. In order to see an archives interior with VIEW, that archive type must have been defined in the Archive Configuration. NOTE: The default DOSHELP.ASC ZIP This command is the opposite of the UNZIP command. It has the same format however: ZIP FILENAME.EXT FILE1.EXT [FILE2.EXT ...] FILENAME.EXT is the full path and filename with extension, FILE1.EXT is the full path and filename for the first file to be archived. [FILE2.EXT ...] is any other files you want to stick in the archive. The archive type you're compressing to must be defined in the Archive Configuration. <X>: <X> = Drive Letter: Normal DOS Change Drive command. ie - C: changes to the C drive, D: to the drive, and so on. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 16 - Infoform Questionnaire System ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ────────────────────────────── Chapter 16─A: How They're Made ────────────────────────────── Infoform questionnaires are text files with certain commands that only have meaning to the BBS. The questionnaire is stored in the MISC directory, in a file with the extension .INF, .INA or .INV (No Emulation, ANSI Emulation, or Avatar Emulation, respectively.) When users answer the question(s), their answers are also stored in the MISC directory, in a file with the extension ".ASW". Answers from other users are appended to the end of the answer file. ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 16─B: New User Questionnaire ─────────────────────────────────── A special Infoform questionnaire called NEWUSER is always given to a new user during the new user logon process. An example is listed below: ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Alright! Only a few more questions to go before you can logon. Please answer the questions, as they are essential for Validation and just as a security measure. Don't worry though.... It's not a test. (it's a quiz..) ;YAre you the SysOp of a BBS (Y/N)? : * ;INO,NOSYSOP What is the Phone # of the BBS? ###─###─#### ;A ? * ;AWhat BBS software do you run? * ;AHow long has it been running for? * ;GNOSYSOP1 :NOSYSOP Oh well! Someone's gotta do it, eh? :NOSYSOP1 Do you know of any of the current users on this BBS, or any other good users that could recommend you? (2 lines) ;A 1) * ;A 2) * Ok! Thanks for answering the questions, and I'm sure you'll be validated very soon! ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 16─C: Questionnaire Commands ─────────────────────────────────── Below are listed all the Infoform questionnaire commands currently supported by Renegade. All commands must start on a separate line, beginning with a ";" character. Labels also start on a separate line, but beginning with a ":" character, and are followed by a string of characters which define the label name. Everything else is treated as straight text. A "; <string>" line is treated as a comment. Command: A<string>* Function: Displays <string> then inputs the string at the "*" character. Command: B<string>* Function: Similar to the "A" command, except input is uppercase only. Command: C"chars"<string>* Function: Displays string, then inputs a single character at the "*" character. Only accepted answers are the characters between the quote marks (""). Command: Dx<string> Function: Outputs a doorfile (See Door in Menu Commands for x) then executes <string>. All rules for standard door commands apply. Command: F<Flag Toggles> Function: Will toggle the AR flags. Refer to the Commandkey "OF" in Chapter 11─D─12 for information on the <Flag Toggles>. Command: G<label> Function: Goes to label <label>. If <label> doesn't exist, the questionnaire will terminate. Command: H Function: Terminates questionnaire and hangs up on user. Command: I<string>,<label> Function: Branches to <label> if <string> was the last input value from a "A", "B", "C", or "Y" command. Command: K Function: Terminate questionnaire without saving answers. Command: L<string> Function: Outputs <string> to the questionnaire answer file only. Command: N<String>* Function: Displays <string>, then accepts either a "Y", or "N" at the "*" character. Defaults to No. Command: Q Function: Terminates questionnaire and saves answers in answer file. Command: R<Flag Toggles> Function: Will toggle the AC flags. Refer to the Commandkey "OG" in Chapter 11─D─12 for information on the <Flag Toggles>. Command: T<filename> Function: Displays the file <filename>. Command: V<level> Function: Will validate a user up to level <level>. Command: Y<string>* Function: Same as N<String>, but defaults to Yes instead of No. Command: S<ACS>,LABEL Function: If the user matches the ACS specified between quotes, execution will branch to LABEL, like the G command. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 17 - Run─Time Errors ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Certain errors while Renegade is online cause it to exit back to DOS. Whenever this occurs, the screen image is sent to a file called ERROR.LOG in your main BBS directory, along with certain pieces of information such as the time, date, error number, BBS version, the user who was on and what baud rate they were on at. A message is also sent to the SysOp log, and the user's screen when a error occurs. If a error does occur in Renegade, please report it to either your local support hub, or one of the Renegade Alpha sites. Please send along the information at the top of the section where the error is in the ERROR.LOG file. ────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 17─A Default Renegade Errorlevels ────────────────────────────────────────── 0 No error 1 Critical error 2 New Echomail entered 255 Normal Exit from WFC screen ───────────────────────────── Chapter 17─B DOS Errorlevels ───────────────────────────── 2 File not found. 3 Path not found. 4 Too many open files. 5 File access denied. 6 Invalid file handle. 12 Invalid file access code. 15 Invalid drive number. 16 Cannot remove current directory. 17 Cannot rename across drives. ───────────────────────────── Chapter 17─C I/O Errorlevels ───────────────────────────── 100 Disk read error. 101 Disk write error. 102 File not assigned. 103 File not open. 104 File not open for input. 105 File not open for output. 106 Invalid numeric format. ────────────────────────────────── Chapter 17─D Critical Errorlevels ────────────────────────────────── 150 Disk is write─protected. 151 Unknown unit. 152 Drive not ready. 153 Unknown command. 154 CRC error in data. 155 Bad drive request structure length. 156 Disk seek error. 157 Unknown media type. 158 Sector not found. 159 Printer out of paper. 160 Device write fault. 161 Device read fault. 162 Hardware failure. ─────────────────────────────── Chapter 17─E Fatal Errorlevels ─────────────────────────────── 200 Division by zero. 201 Range check error. 202 Stack overflow error. 203 Heap overflow error. 204 Invalid pointer operation. 205 Floating point overflow. 206 Floating point underflow. 207 Invalid floating point operation. 208 Overlay manager not installed. 209 Overlay file read error. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 18 - Optional Files ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── xxx = .ANS, .ASC, .AVT, or .RIP for ANSI, ASCII, AVATAR, or RIP respectively. (See Below) 2MANYCAL.xxx ─ Displayed when a user logs on more times than allowed per day ACSEA#.xxx ─ Displayed to users during ACS event number # ACSEB#.xxx ─ Displayed to users refused during ACS event number # ACTIONS.xxx - List of available actions for teleconferencing. (This is displayed by the /LIST command in Teleconference. Any changes to this file must be made by hand) ACTIONS.LST - See Chapter 20-B ARLEVEL#.xxx ─ Displayed to users with AR flag # set AUTOVAL.xxx ─ Displayed when users password validate themselves BATCHUL.xxx ─ Displayed before batch upload protocol is selected BATCHUL0.xxx ─ Displayed when batch upload is select with 0 files in queue BBSEH.xxx BBS Listing extended header BBSET.xxx BBS Listing extended trailer BBSME.xxx BBS Listing middle extended BBSMN.xxx BBS Listing middle normal BBSNH.xxx BBS Listing normal header BBSNT.xxx BBS Listing normal trailer BDAY.xxx ─ Displayed on the user's birthday BDYS.xxx ─ Displayed if the user has had a birthday since their last call BULLETIN.xxx - Menu Ansi displayed during logon or by the OS CmdKey CHATEND.xxx ─ Displayed when exiting chat. CHATINIT.xxx ─ Displayed when breaking into chat. CHATOVR.xxx ─ Displayed if user has chat override ACS and sysop not avail. COLOR.xxx ─ Color help file for inside message editor. CONF#.xxx ─ Displayed after joining conference #. (# = @, A─Z) CONFLIST.xxx ─ Displayed in place of internal conference listing DLBMAX.xxx Can't flag: Batch would exceed up/down ratio DLBTMAX.xxx Can't flag: Batch would exceed max DLs per day DLHOURS.xxx ─ displayed during hours when downloading isn't allowed DLMAX.xxx Can't download: Exceeded up/down ratio DLTMAX.xxx Can't download: Exceeded max DLs per day DLOAD.XXX Displayed before downloading a file DOSHELP.xxx Renegade's DOS emulator help file. DSL###.xxx ─ Displayed to users of Download Security Level ### GOAWAY.xxx ─ Displayed when user attempts to chat more than allowed times HANGUP##.xxx ─ Displayed when you hangup with the HANGUPxx option LASTH.xxx Last Caller header LASTM.xxx Last Calller middle LASTT.xxx Last Caller trailer LOGOFF.xxx ─ Displayed when the user is logged off LOGON#.xxx ─ Displayed after the user logs on, in sequence (# = 1─9) MULTILOG.xxx Displayed if a user tries logging in while on another node. NETMHELP.xxx Displayed right after a user selects to send NETMAIL NEWAPP.xxx ─ Displayed right before new user application email sent. NEWLET.ASC Letter sent to newusers; See Appendix M NEWUSER.xxx ─ Displayed to newusers NOACCESS.xxx Displayed if a user doesn't have access to a menu. NOBAUD.xxx ─ Displayed to callers who call in at less than the minimum baud NOBAUDH.xxx ─ Displayed to low baud callers who call outside low baud times NOCREDS.XXX Displayed to users w/o credits at logon NODELH.xxx Node Listing header NODELM.xxx Node Listing middle NODELT.xxx Node Listing trailer NONEWUSR.xxx ─ Displayed when system refuses new users. NONODE.xxx ─ Displayed when user doesn't have the acs to log on to that node NOSHUTT.xxx Displayed when a user has not been validated at shuttle NOSYSOP.xxx ─ Displayed when the sysop didn't answer chat call NOTLEFT.xxx ─ Displayed when they run out of time NOTLEFTA.xxx ─ Displayed when user attempt to logon with no time left NOTE: If either of these files, NOTLEFT or NOTLEFTA exist in your MISC directory, Renegade will not offer to allow a timed out user to withdraw time from their time bank at logon. ONCEONLY.xxx Displayed to a user at logon only if it's NEW since last logon PRELOGON.xxx ─ Displayed after Copyright notice, before login prompt. PRESHUTL.xxx ─ Displayed before the Shuttle menu PRHELP.xxx ─ Message Editor help file PROTBDL.xxx ─ Protocols Listing ─ Batch Download PROTBUL.xxx ─ Protocols Listing ─ Batch Upload PROTRES.xxx ─ Protocols Listing ─ Resume protocols PROTSDL.xxx ─ Protocols Listing ─ Single Download PROTSUL.xxx ─ Protocols Listing ─ Single Upload PWCHANGE.xxx ─ Displayed when forcing a password change REQFILE.xxx ─ displayed when an offline file is requested for dl REVENT#.xxx ─ Displayed when system event number # is approaching. SL###.xxx ─ Displayed to users of Security Level ### TELECONF.xxx Displayed when users first enter Teleconferencing. TELEHELP.xxx ─ Displayed as help file in Teleconferencing TERMINAL.xxx Displayed before asking terminal emulation type TIMEDOUT.xxx ─ Displayed when the user times out UPLOAD.xxx ─ Displayed before uploading a file USER###.xxx ─ Displayed to user number ### WELCOME#.XXX ─ All welcome # (# = 1─9) files will be displayed in sequence. WRNGBDAY.xxx Displayed to a user that fails the birthdate check. YESBAUDH.MSG ─ Displayed when 300 baud caller calls during 300 baud times YOURINFO.xxx Displays information about the user. NOTE: Formerly, this file was displayed by the OY command key in place of the default screen. However, as of Renegade v5─11 Exp, the OY command key has been removed. Copy the YOURINFO.ASC included in this archive to your MISC directory and change OY to ─F in all your menus, and change #6. Options to say YOURINFO. Renegade looks for certain extensions when displaying files out of the MISC directory. Which file is displayed depends on the extension (.xxx) and the users emulation. The extensions are defined as follows: ASC - This generally denotes a plain text file. It can contain color codes which are displayed to users in any emulation mode. ANS - This denotes a file saved in ANSI and will be displayed to users who have ANSI emulation or above. AN1─AN9 - If a file with the extension of .AN1 exists, Renegade will pick and display a random file. For example; During the logon sequence, WELCOME.ANS is displayed. If WELCOME.AN1 exists, Renegade will randomnly choose which file file to display. This can go on from AN1 to AN9, allowing you to define up to ten files (ANS counts as well) of which Renegade will choose and display one of them. A0S─A6S - These files are displayed on different days of the week, ranging from 0:Sunday to 6:Saturday.They can be used in conjunction with the random files, too. (WELCOME.A01 for example, means the first (1) random ANSI displayed on Sundays). AVT - This denotes a file saved in Avatar, and will be displayed to users who have Avatar emulation or above. If a user selects Avatar as their emulation, and no .AVT files exist, Renegade will fall back and display ANSI files instead. If no .ANS files are found, it will fall back to .ASC. AV1-AV9 - Avatar follows the same guidelines for random files that ANSI does, only with AV1-AV9 as the valid extensions. RIP - This extension denotes a file saved in RIP format (see Glossary of Terms). RIP files are forced to display, even in expert mode. If a user selects RIP as their emulation, and no .RIP files exist, it will fall back to Avatar, then Ansi, and then to .ASC if necessary. RI1-RI9 - RIP follows the same guidelines for random files that ANSI does, only with RI1-RI9 as the valid extensions. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 19 - Order of Logons ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ─────────────────────────────────── Chapter 19─A: Order of Normal Logon ─────────────────────────────────── The following is the order in which files and strings are displayed in a normal logon. If Logging on from the Shuttle Menu: ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 1. PRESHUTL.xxx (If Available) After user selects to logon, or if user uses any commands that require him/her to login with their information. 2. Enter Name or User # 3. Enter Password 4. Enter Phone Number (Toggle) 5. Enter Birthday (After a definable # of logons) 6. Renegade Logo and Copyright Information 7. PRELOGON.xxx (If Available) 8. WELCOME.xxx (If Available) or WELCOME#.xxx where # = 1─9, in sequence. (For all available) (NOTE: If WELCOME#.xxx is available, WELCOME.xxx will not be displayed) 9. LOGON.xxx (If Available) LOGON#.xxx where # = 1─9, in sequence. (For all available) (NOTE: If LOGON#.xxx is available, LOGON.xxx will not be displayed) 10. Last Few Callers (Toggle) 11. SL###.xxx (If Applicable, and If Available) 12. DSL###.xxx (If Applicable, and If Available) 13. ARLEVEL#.* (If Applicable, and If Available) 14. USER###.* (If Available) 15. ONCEONLY.* (If Applicable, and If Available) 16. BDAY.* or BDYS.* (If Applicable, and If Available) 17. AutoMessage (Toggle) 18. User Information Screen (Toggle) 19. "New bulletins: ###,###,etc. Read them?" (Toggle, and If Applicable) If User Selects to view updated bulletins 20 BULLETIN.* 21 "You have not voted..." (If Applicable) 22. "<name> replied to <subject> on <date>" (If Applicable) 23. "You Received XXX file points..." (If Applicable) 24. "Read Your Email?" (If Applicable) 25 Forced Password Change (Definable, displays PWCHANGE.xxx if available) If startout menu specified, goto Startout Menu If nothing specified in Startout menu: 26. MAIN.MNU If Not Logging on from the Shuttle Menu: ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── 1. Renegade Logo and Copyright Information 2. PRELOGON.xxx (If Available) 3. Enter Name or User # 4. Enter Password 5. Enter Phone Number (Toggle) 6. Enter Birthday (After a definable # of logons) 7. WELCOME.xxx (If Available) or WELCOME#.xxx where # = 1─9, in sequence. (For all available) (NOTE: If WELCOME#.xxx is available, WELCOME.xxx will not be displayed) 8. LOGON.xxx (If Available) LOGON#.xxx where # = 1─9, in sequence. (For all available) (NOTE: If LOGON#.xxx is available, LOGON.xxx will not be displayed) 9. Last Few Callers (Toggle) 10. SL###.xxx (If Applicable, and If Available) 11. DSL###.xxx (If Applicable, and If Available) 12. ARLEVEL#.* (If Applicable, and If Available) 13. USER###.* (If Available) 14. ONCEONLY.* (If Applicable, and If Available) 15. BDAY.* or BDYS.* (If Applicable, and If Available) 16. AutoMessage (Toggle) 17. User Information Screen (Toggle) 18. "New bulletins: ###,###,etc. Read them?" (Toggle, and If Applicable) If User Selects to view updated bulletins 19 BULLETIN.* 20 "You have not voted..." (If Applicable) 21. "<name> replied to <subject> on <date>" (If Applicable) 22. "You Received XXX file points..." (If Applicable) 23. "Read Your Email?" (If Applicable) 24. Forced Password Change (Definable, displays PWCHANGE.xxx if available) If startout menu specified, goto Startout Menu If nothing specified in Startout menu: 25. Main Menu ───────────────────────────────────── Chapter 19─B: Order of New User Logon ───────────────────────────────────── The following is the order in which files and strings are displayed when a user applies for access. ──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── If Refuse New User is On and Shuttle Menu is Off 1. NONEWUSR.xxx (If Available) and System drops carrier. If Refuse New User is Off (Shuttle Menu setting is irrelevant) 2. Prompt for New User Password (If Available, Definable) If New User Password is incorrect after 3 attempts 3. NONEWUSR.xxx (If Available) and System drops carrier. If New User Password is correct, or not defined 4. NEWUSER.xxx 5. Question Sequence (17 new─user questions) 1. User name or alias 2. Real name 3. Country Calling From 4. Street address 5. City, State 6. Zip code 7. Voice phone number 8. Gender 9. Birthdate 10. SysOp Defined Question #1 11. SysOp Defined Question #2 12. SysOp Defined Question #3 13. Screen Width 14. Screen Length 15. Screen Clearing 16. Screen Pausing 17. Password 6. NEWINFO.MNU, User saves information 7. NEWLET.ASC sent to User (If Available) 8. NEWUSER.INF (If Available) 9. NEWAPP.* (If New User Letter to the Sysop is Enabled) 10. New User Letter to the Sysop (If Enabled) If Shuttle Menu is turned On 11. User is dropped back at the Shuttle Menu If Shuttle Menu is turned Off 12. "Read Your Email?" (If Applicable) If startout menu specified, goto Startout Menu If nothing specified in Startout menu: 25. Main Menu ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 20 - Teleconference ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Teleconference Notes: All of the commands in this section that have username options (like /MSG, /EJECT, etc.) can have partial usernames. Ex: /PRIVATE Adr will send a private message to an online user with A,d, and r as the first part of their handle. As of v98-101b, the Teleconference commands changed in syntax. They've been expanded from their former single letter commands (/P to /PRIVATE for example). The WHATSNEW wasn't entirely correct in the listed changes for Teleconference. The following mistakes were made in the WHATSNEW regarding the changes to Teleconferencing: A) The maximum number of global channels is erroneously reported as 255. The true maximum number is 32767. B) The /REGISTRY command was omitted from the WHATSNEW, but is documented below. ──────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 20-A: Basic Teleconference Commands ──────────────────────────────────────────── /? Displays Help Screen (TELEHELP.xxx) //\\<CmdKey> Executes <CmdKey> from teleconference. Sysop ACS Required. /[ACTION] Where [ACTION] is an action defined in the ACTIONS.LST File. Performs the chosen action. /ANON Toggles the room between anonymous and non-anonymous mode. Must have a minimum of CoSysop ACS or be the moderator of the room in order to use this command. /BYE Logoff the system and hangup the modem /CLS Clears the screen /ECHO Toggles a users echo on and off. If Echo is on, everything you type will be echoed back and displayed to you as well as to everyone else. If Echo is off, only what you originally typed will be shown on your side. /EJECT [USER|NODE] Ejects either UserName or Node #, as specified, from the current room. Must have a minimum of CoSysop ACS or be the moderator of the room in order to use this command. Additionally, this command will not affect a user with Sysop ACS. /FORGET [USER|NODE] Anything sent by either UserName or Node #, as specified, will be ignored and not shown on your display. /INTERRUPT Toggles whether or not the users typing will be interrupted by messages sent by another node. If Interrupt is on, messages from other nodes will display as soon as they are sent. If Interrupt is off, messages from other nodes will not display until the user finishes typing. /INVITE [USER|NODE] Invites the specified user or node to a room. If the room is private, must have either Moderator status or CoSysop ACS to use this command. /JOIN [Channel #] Leaves your current global channel and joins the specified one. If you join Channel 0, you are considered not to be in a channel. /LIST Displays the list of actions available for Teleconference (ACTIONS.xxx) /ME [Action] Performs an action, the users name will be inserted where the /ME is. ie, /ME commits ritual suicide will display <Username> commits ritual suicide /MODERATE [Topic] Makes the current user the moderator of the room, and optionally sets the rooms topic. Room #1 can only be moderated by a user with at least CoSysop ACS. All other rooms may be moderated by any user on a first come, first serve basis. /MSG [MSG] Sends a message through your current global channel. /PART Leaves your current global channel. /PRIVATE [USER|NODE] [MSG] Sends a private message to either UserName or Node #, as specified. /PUBLIC Toggles the room between public and private status. Must have moderator status or CoSysop ACS in order to use this command. /QUIT [MSG] Quits teleconference, with an optional message /REGISTRY [USER] This command will show the specified users responses to the infoform named REGISTRY if the answer file (REGISRTRY.ASW) exists in the MISC directory. This command is the sole exception to the partial username option. You *must* specify the fullname of the user who's registry entry you wish to view. /REMEMBER [USER|NODE] Remembers a forgotten user (Messages sent by them will be displayed on the remembering users end again) /ROOM [Room Number] Join Room Number. NOTE: The number of rooms available depends on the number of nodes the system has. ie, a 2 node system can have 2 rooms, a 10 node system can have a maximum of 10 rooms, etc. /SHOW [Room Number] If no Room Number is specified, this command will display a list of users in all active rooms. If a Room Number is specified, then only the users in the that room will be shown. /WHO Displays the list of users currently online. Global Channels: You may or may not be wondering what a Global Channel is. When you join a Global Channel (1-32767), any message sent on that channel will be displayed to everyone on the channel wherever they are on the BBS (the exceptions are if a member of the channel is in a Door or transferring files, in which case the messages will be displayed when the door is exited, or the transfer complete). Global Messages are sent via the /MSG command while in a chat room. ─────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 20-B: Predefined Actions (ACTIONS.LST) ─────────────────────────────────────────────── The Teleconferencing Action File is a file named ACTIONS.LST in your DATA directory which will have pre─defined actions like the "/a" command, but without the "/a" use. The format is: [KEYWORD] [STRING SHOWN TO USER] [STRING SHOWN TO ALL BUT RECEIVER] [STRING SHOWS TO ALL IF THERE IS NO RECEIVER] [STRING SHOWN TO RECEIVER] The 2 MCI codes that are for this file only are %S and %R, which stand for Sender and Receiver, respectively. A sample file: ────────────────────── kick ... and the kick is good! %S just kicked %R square in the butt! %S is kicking blindly! %S just kicked you square in the butt! laugh Hahahahahahahahhahah!!! %S is laughing at %R! %S just burst out laughing! %S is pointing at you and laughing! punch Ouch! That's smarts! %S just punched %R right in the face! %S is punching blindly! %S just punched you right in the face! ────────────────────── If you enter "kick slammin" for example, %S is replaced with your handle, and %R is replaced with "slammin". ────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 20─C: External Programs through Teleconference ────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Teleconference now allows users to execute external programs via a special type of action format. The first part of the action is an ":EXECx PROGRAM", where x is the drop file type and PROGRAM is the name of the program or batch file to run. Sample format: ────────────────────── TW :EXECG TW.BAT BLANK─> %S|15 is going to play TradeWars! BLANK─> It is imperitive that you leave in necessary blanks! ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 21 - Common Modem Initialization Strings ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── In these days of high speed modems, it goes without saying; Turn the Com Port locking on. It also goes without saying that you need a 16550 UART. :) Lock the Port at it's maximum baud rate in Renegade, as well as via your fossil driver (refer to your fossil drivers documentation for instructions on doing so). Be forewarned, when locking your port at 115200, there's a chance that some older doors won't work. They were originally programmed with 57600 as the highest baud rate, and the extra character will throw it off. I recommend setting 57600 as your locked rates in everything. This list of init strings is by no means comprehensive. If you have anything to contribute to it, please send all addition to [email protected] or to Ken Reaverson at 1:133/1004 via Fido netmail. [ For All Hayes Compatible Modems ] 4. Modem answer : ^ATA| 5. Modem hangup : +++~~~^ATH0| 6. Modem offhook : ^ATH1M0| 9. CTS/RTS flow : On A. XON/XOFF flow : Off [ Generic 2400 baud ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 2400 3. Modem init : ATV1S0=0&C1&D2M0E0| 7. COM port locking : Off [ Generic 14.4k / 9600 baud ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : at\n3&k3&q5v1&c1&d2x4s0=0h0e0w2| 7. COM port locking : On [ Boca 28.8 Vfc ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : ATZ| 7. COM port locking : On There are a few extra things that need to be done in order to get this modem to work. Load your favorite terminal program, and following the steps below in order. Step 1. AT&F Step 2. AT&C1&D2S0=0S95=3S11=55 Step 3. AT&W That should get you something close to this: ACTIVE PROFILE: B1 E1 L1 M1 N1 P Q0 V1 W1 X4 Y0 &C1 &D2 &G0 &J0 &K3 &Q5 &R1 &S0 &T4 &X0 &Y0 S00:000 S01:000 S02:043 S03:013 S04:010 S05:008 S06:002 S07:020 S08:002 S09:006 S10:014 S11:060 S12:050 S18:000 S25:000 S26:001 S36:007 S37:018 S38:020 S44:020 S46:138 S48:007 S95:003 STORED PROFILE 0: B1 E1 L1 M0 N1 P Q0 V1 W1 X4 Y0 &C1 &D2 &G0 &J0 &K3 &Q5 &R1 &S0 &T4 &X0 S00:000 S02:043 S06:002 S07:020 S08:002 S09:006 S10:014 S11:060 S12:050 S18:000 S36:007 S37:000 S40:105 S41:135 S46:138 S95:003 Then leave your init string in Renegade at ATZ, and you'll be fine. * Submitted by: Charles Bowman [ Cardinal 28.8i ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : AT&FE0M0&S1S95=3H0| 7. COM port locking : On * Submitted by: Carlton Griffin [ Cardinal 28.8/33.6 MVP288IS ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : AT&FE0M0&S1S95=3#CID=1H0| 7. COM port locking : On * Submitted by: Carlton Griffin [ Hayes 28.8k ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 115200 3. Modem init : ATH0Z0| * 7. COM port locking : Off For the Hayes 28.8, you have to program your modem's volatile memory before hand. To do such, press TAB in Renegade to talk to modem and enter: AT&F <ENTER> ATW2S95=46 <ENTER> AT&W0 <ENTER> Also, this modem is extremely picky.. I have only been able to get it working with X00.SYS v1.70 Alpha by locking the port at 38400 through the fossil and leaving Renegade unlocked. [ Suprafax 14.4k v.32bis ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : at&f2v1&c1&d2x4s0=0h0e0w2| 7. COM port locking : On [ USRobotics 28.8 v.34 ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : ATHMES25=0S0=0| 7. COM port locking : On * Submitted by: Tom Marks [ Zoom 14.4k ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : at&f&c1&d2v1m0s0=0s95=3| 7. COM port locking : On [ Zoom 28.8k ] 1. Maximum baud rate: 57600 3. Modem init : at&c1&d2&k3h0m0e0v1w2| 7. COM port locking : On ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 22 - Conference System ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Conferences can be a royal pain in the ass for the newbies to understand. The best way to explain how conferences work is by real-world example, so I'll be explaining them in terms of what I used them for on my own system. I'm a member of more than a few echomail networks. Not all of my users like to see everything I have available at one time, nor do they like scanning through an arealist of several hundred message bases just to find one in particular. My solution was to break them up into conferences. You have 27 conferences available to you; @,A-Z. Each one can be used to represent a category, a message network, or whatever you'd like. The first thing to do is define the conferences within the conference editor (see Chapter 14). My list looks something like this; Conference A - Local Message Bases B - FidoNet C - GuildeNet D - Paranor None of these contain material which I need to restrict from young or immature eyes, so all the above conferences have their ACS set to ^. Alright, so now I've defined the conferences. Big fragging deal, right? They don't do much but sit there. Conferences are actually part of the ACS System (see Chapter 3). Implementing a conference looks something like this: Message base #189 of 193 1. Name : [Fido] - Renegade Support 2. Filename : RG 3. Base type : EchoMail Message path: C:\REN\ECHO\RG\ 4. ACS req. : cB 5. Post/MCI ACS: / % 6. Sysop ACS : fM 7. Max Mess : 300 8. Anonymous : No 9. Password : N. Net Address : 1:133/1004 C. Colors : Text=4, Quote=3, Tear=3, Origin=4 M. Mail flags : -S-/T- O. Origin line : The Holy Church of Tremere T. Toggles : R---- P. QWK Index : 182 Q. Quit Note option #4, ACS required. As per defined in Chapter 3, the c portion means conference, and the letter following is which conference the user must be in for access. So for this message base, a user must be in conference B in order to see the message base. Local Message Bases would receive an ACS of cA, GuildeNet would receive cC, and so on until all message bases and defined conferences are accounted for. The procedure is basically the same if you want to split your filebases into conferences. Okay, so now your message bases are all categorized. Next problem; there are only two Join Conference commands present on the system; one on the Main Menu, one on the Message Menu. Your users probably don't have a clue that you've switched to a conferencing system, so they're probably getting lost trying to find their favorite message base. The solution? Add a 'Join Which Conference?' prompt to the message newscanning process. The first thing to do towards accomplishing this is to load up the menu editor, load the Main Menu, and then locate the command that initiates the Message newscan. Insert something that looks like the following directly (sequentially) in front of the message newscan command: Menu filename: MAIN Command #12 of 30 1. Long descript : 2. Short descript: 3. Menu keys :M 4. ACS required :"" 5. Cmdkeys :OR 6. Options : Flags :None Q. Quit There's an important concept here; command stacking. Note option 3, Menu Keys. You already have a command defined for Menu Key M, the message newscanning command. Now you're adding OR (which means Change Conference). What happens if two or more commands use the same Menu key within the same menu? All occurances of the same Menu Key execute in the sequential order that they appear within the menu. Now, in English; let's say Command #2 on the Main Menu uses Menu Key M. Now let's say that so does Main Menu Command #37. If this were the case, then when M is pressed from the main menu, command #2 would execute and then command #37 would execute immediately afterwards. The user would press one key, yet execute two commands. So, now you've added the above command so that it appears in front of the message newscanning command. What happens when you save this menu, logon, and press M from the Main Menu? You're prompted to join a conference, and then asked if you want to scan for new messages, just like normal. Now those conferences you defined back at the beginning of this section actually mean something! The message bases are categorized, your users are praising your efforts, and there is Joy in Mudville. Next Concept: Global Conference Remember how I said above that some users don't want to see everything all at once, that they don't like to be deluged with hundreds of message bases at once? Well, believe it or not, there are some users who actually *do* want to see everything all at once. They become very annoyed at having to change back and forth between conferences in order to make sure they don't miss anything. What's a poor sysop to do? This is where a Global Conference comes into play. The first thing to do is select an unused conference to fill the role. I use Conference Z, so now my conference list looks something like this: Conference A - Local Message Bases B - FidoNet C - GuildeNet D - Paranor Z - Join All Conferences I still have nothing to hide from the users, so each defined Conference ACS remains at ^. Now for the implementation: 1. Name : [Fido] - Renegade Support 2. Filename : RG 3. Base type : EchoMail Message path: C:\REN\ECHO\RG\ 4. ACS req. : cB|cZ Note the change in ACS requirements; instead of cB, it's now cB|cZ. The | separating the two ACS codes means 'or' (See Chapter 3). So in order to see this message base, a user would have to be in either conference B or in conference Z. All FidoNet bases would get this ACS, while the Local Message Bases get cA|cZ, GuildeNet gets cC|cZ, et al. Of course, you could just tell the I-wanna-see-everything masochists to frag off and live with it. ;) ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 23 - Setting Up Doors ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Doors are among the easiest things to setup once you figure out how. It's while gaining the knowhow that confusion sometimes results (I've lost count of how many times I've been asked for a copy of my DOOR.SYS) First, you should understand what a door is; it's a third party program designed to do something specific (whether it be a game, a user registry, or an offline mail door) that runs independently of the BBS. In order to run correctly, the BBS and the Door need to have some common form of communication; this is done via dropfiles. A dropfile is something generated by the BBS. The BBS puts important stuff like the online users name, which com port they're connect on, and how much time they have left online into the dropfile. A dropfile is dynamic, and it can change several times in the course of a single call. Basically, the BBS takes a look at the current state of things, dumps that info into the dropfile, then lets the Door take over. The Door reads the dropfile, gets what info it needs, and then does whatever it was programmed to do. When the Door is done doing it's thing, it turns control back over to the BBS. Each door wants to be setup in it's own special way. Some are fairly simple and some can drive a sysop to fits of mad rage. It would be impossible to give an all-knowing account of how to setup every kind of door known to sysop. There is a general formula, however. The first and most important thing is to figure out which dropfile format the door supports. Renegade and the Door must support a common format, otherwise you cannot use the door. Renegade supports the following dropfile types: DOOR.SYS,DORINFO1.DEF,SFDOORS.DAT,CALLINFO.BBS,PCBOARD.SYS, and CHAIN.TXT Most modern doors support DOOR.SYS and/or DORINFO1.DEF. If you're given a choice of formats, use DOOR.SYS whenever possible. The next thing that needs to be figured out is where in bog's name is Renegade creating the dropfile? Each node has to set it's dropfile path via the Modem/Node Configuration (See Chapter 6-B). If it's not defined, the dropfile *should* be created in the main Renegade directory (which for the rest of this example, will be C:\RG). For simplicity's sake, we'll assume the drop file is being created in C:\RG. Usurper is my door of choice for the following example. Some doors are picky, they like the dropfiles to be present in the same directory that the door is being run from. Usurper is one of these; that means I have to get the dropfile from Renegade's main directory to Usurper's directory. Batch File time. --Begin USURP.BAT-- @echo off cd\door\usurper copy c:\rg\door.sys usurper cd\rg --End USURP.BAT-- This copies the DOOR.SYS to Usurpers directory, and then runs the game. Note: Some doors are nice. They have configuration programs that will ask you where the dropfile is, and then they'll look for it in whatever directory you pointed it towards. Again, it's important to stress that each door has it's own way of working. Some you're going to have to fiddle with in order to get working, and gods forbid you ever have to worry about setting a door up for multinode use. Okay, now to actually make the BBS run the game. :) First things first; By this time I've read through Usurpers documentation and I'm sure I've got it configured correctly. After that, I add the menu command to invoke it. The command looks something like this: Menu filename: ONLINE Command #12 of 30 1. Long descript :(1) Usurper 2. Short descript:(1) Usurper 3. Menu keys :1 4. ACS required :"" 5. Cmdkeys :DG 6. Options :c:\rg\usurp.bat Flags :None Q. Quit The Menu Key is 1; that means I press 1 in order to run this command. The CmdKey is DG, which tells Renegade to generate a DOOR.SYS. (For the full list of which CmdKeys generate which dropfiles, refer to Chapter 11-D-7) The option tells Renegade what to run in order to load the door. The overall effect works something like this; I press 1, Renegade generates DOOR.SYS in it's main directory and then runs usurp.bat. If everything is configured correctly, Usurper comes up, I spend 15 minutes committing vile acts of darkness, the BBS reloads, and I find another game to play. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 24 - Renegade Under OS/2 Warp 3 or 4 ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ------------------------------------------------- The following instructions go into detail about how to configure your OS/2 system for optimum performance. Once configured properly, Renegade runs very well under OS/2. The following topics are covered: - General Tips and Information - Tame - SIO - The Work Place Shell (WPS) - Filebar - Creating a Telnet Node - Transfer Protocols - Running OS/2 Programs With Renegade In several places in this document I reference my system for locating various programs. Please note the following information for contacting me and accessing my system: EMail address: [email protected] Netmail and FREQ addresses: 1:[email protected] 50:[email protected] BBS #: 412-746-3592 If you are unable to FREQ a file from me, for whatever reason, and you have access to InterNet EMail, feel free to EMail me and ask that I send you the file. I will be more than happy to send you whatever files you need. What You Need ------------- Before you begin, there are two things you will need: 1. Ray Gwinn's superb fossil driver, SIO. It can found on any good OS/2 BBS or at the author's world wide web site at http://www.gwinn.com. It can also be obtained from my system via File REQuest as SIO. As of this writing, the latest version is v1.60d. SIO is Shareware. 2. A program to free up "time slices" for OS/2 while Renegade is idle. I use and highly recommend Tame, by David G. Thomas. It can be found on the InterNet at ftp://hobbes.nmsu.edu/pub/dos/tame333.zip. It can also be found at any good OS/2 BBS, including mine, requestable as TAME. As of this writing, the latest version is 3.33. Tame is Shareware. General Tips and FYI -------------------- Following are some basic tips on how OS/2 functions and how to improve its performance: - OS/2 has a CONFIG.SYS and an AUTOEXEC.BAT just like DOS. However, the CONFIG.SYS is used exclusively for OS/2 applications. OS/2 apps do NOT see any of the settings in the AUTOEXEC.BAT! The AUTOEXEC.BAT is used exclusively for DOS applications. This is very convenient for DOS applications, because if they require changes in the AUTOEXEC.BAT, you do not have to reboot for the changes to take effect. Simply make the changes, exit the DOS session, and open a new one! Programs such as device drivers for DOS applications can be loaded in the DOS_DEVICE settings for the app (see below). - If configured properly, device drivers for OS/2 sessions also apply to DOS sessions. For example, if you can use your mouse in an OS/2 session, you can probably use it in a DOS session without having to load a mouse driver. The same goes for CDROMs and network drivers. - File sharing capabilities are part of OS/2. It does not require SHARE.EXE to be loaded. - OS/2's method of undeleting files requires the environment variable DELDIR to be set. DOS undelete programs sometimes work on FAT partitions, but they do not work on HPFS partitions. - If you are unsure what an OS/2 command or error message means, type "help <error>" or "help <command>" for help on that command. This is useful for unspecific error messages and for finding out what all those commands mean in your config.sys. :) - By default, OS/2 verifies the writing of every file to your drive. This is secure, yes, but time consuming, especially for disk intensive applications, such as mail tossing. I recommend turning off VERIFY for atleast your mail tossing batch files. - The DELDIR environment variable slows down mail tossing as well. I suggest making sure DELDIR is not set for your mail tossing batch files. - DOS batch files have the extension .BAT. OS/2 batch files have the extension .CMD. If a .CMD file starts with "/*", OS/2 considers it a REXX program, and will not treat it as a normal batch file. - OS/2 batch programming is the same as DOS batch programming. - High Performance File System (HPFS) drives are much faster and more reliable than File Allocation Table (FAT) drives. HPFS drives can be accessed from all sessions under OS/2. However, without the use of a third party driver, HPFS drives can not be accessed when running straight DOS. With that in mind, if you are planning on running OS/2 most of the time, you might want to consider using an HPFS partition and leave a small FAT partition for when you need to use DOS. Also keep in mind that HPFS requires more memory than FAT. - All programs, especially mail tossing programs, love a disk cache. OS/2's FAT cache is defined in the CONFIG.SYS with the "DISKCACHE" line. OS/2 HPFS cache is defined with the CACHE statement, usually located right after your HPFS driver (usually at the top of your CONFIG.SYS). The FAT cache is limited to 7 megs and the HPFS cache is limited to 2 megs. - You want be careful with using the command EXIT in batch files. It will close the session, whether it be OS/2 or DOS! In some cases, this is desirable. In most, it is not! SIO --- I *HIGHLY* recommend atleast browsing the documentation for SIO before continuing. However, the documentation may be a bit overwhelming at first, especially for the novice. So I am including the basics required to get SIO installed and working properly. First, extract the SIO archive into a directory of its own. Then run INSTALL. The installation program will locate and REM out the lines in your CONFIG.SYS that load the default COM drivers and insert two lines that will load SIO. In most cases, this is all you need to install SIO. However, in some instances, SIO may not work properly without a little intervention on your part. So, after installing SIO, close all your programs and shutdown and restart OS/2. While OS/2 is booting up, watch for the SIO logo and take note what messages it displays. It should display what COM ports it found and loaded support for, and if you have a serial mouse, it should say "Not using COM port - the mouse has it" for that COM port. If SIO did not detect everything, or you want to configure SIO further, edit your CONFIG.SYS and locate the following lines: DEVICE=<directory>\SIO.SYS DEVICE=<directory>\VSIO.SYS If SIO did not detect everything or install properly: - Verify the lines for COM.SYS and VCOM.SYS have been REMed out. - If you have a serial mouse, and SIO did not detect it, verify the VMOUSE.SYS, POINTDD.SYS, and MOUSE.SYS are located in your CONFIG.SYS *ABOVE* the lines for SIO. Be careful not to change the order of these three drivers! If they are loaded in the wrong order, you will loose your mouse support! - If you have a COM port SIO did not detect, it is probably because the port is on a "non-standard" IRQ and address. To tell SIO where it is, add this to the "SIO.SYS" line: (COMx,ADDRESS,IRQy) Where COMx is the COM port, address is the Hex address for the port, and IRQy is the IRQ for the port. Example: DEVICE=c:\sio\sio.sys (COM3,3E8,IRQ2) would tell SIO to look for COM3 at IRQ 2, address 3E8. If you want SIO to lock your ports to a certain rate: - Add a colon after the COMx entry followed by the locked rate. Example: DEVICE=c:\sio\sio.sys (COM1:57600) By default, once a session is using a COM port, another session can NOT access it. To configure SIO to allow multiple access to the COM port: - Add a dash (-) in the fourth parameter for that COM port. Example: DEVICE=c:\sio\sio.sys (COM1,,,-) For further information on SIO, please refer to SIOUSER.TXT and SIOREF.TXT included in the SIO distribution archive. TAME ---- TAME's primary function is to force Renegade to release CPU cycles to the system when Renegade is idle so that other programs can run normally. TAME has a *LOT* of configuration options, and it is easy to be overwhelmed by them all. The basic options are all that are needed, as I will show. First, atleast browse the TAME documentation. Second, add the following line to your batch file(s) that load Renegade: <pathname>\TAME /I <1, 5, or 9> The higher the number is, the more aggressive TAME will be on Renegade. I suggest starting at 5, and if you find that Renegade is running fine, but everything else slows down, change it to 9. If 5 makes Renegade too slow, change it to 1. And that's it! :) For further information on TAME, please see TAME.DOC in the TAME distribution archive. The Work Place Shell -------------------- OS/2 Warp by default uses a program called the Work Place Shell (WPS), which is basically your desktop. It allows you to have icons, dragging and dropping icons, and quite a bit a more. It, however, also uses a *LOT* of memory! So, if you do not have atleast 16 megs of memory, I recommend you use a replacement shell, such as FileBar by Eric A. Wolf. It is not as pretty, nor does it allow as many options as the WPS does. But it uses significantly less memory, and, on low memory environments, it will improve performance immensely! Filebar can be found on the InterNet at at any good OS/2 BBS (including mine :), requestable as FILEBAR. It can also be found on the InterNet at ftp://hobbes.nmsu.edu/pub/os2/shell/fileb205.zip. As of this writing, the latest version is 2.05. Filebar is Shareware. I am including instructions for settings up Renegade using both the WPS and Renegade. If You Use the WPS ------------------ The first thing you need is an icon for Renegade. To create an icon, open your templates folder. Find the "Program" icon, right click on it, and drag a copy of it to your desktop. Once you "drop" it, the properties for your new Icon will display for you to configure. In the path and filename field, type in the path and filename of the batch file you use to run Renegade, or the path to your RENEGADE.EXE if that is how you run it. If you need to include parameters for the filename, place them in the "Parameters" field. You can set the "Working directory" to your Renegade directory, or your mailer directory (if you use a mailer), or you can just leave it blank. At this point, click on the "Session" tab on the right side of the "Program - Settings" window. OS/2 should automatically detect that the program is a DOS program, and it will gray out non-applicable options. Renegade runs best in a DOS fullscreen (but it can be run in a window), so choose "DOS Fullscreen". Then click on the "DOS Settings" button. Click on the "okay" to list all DOS settings. You should now see a very long list of DOS settings. One of the great things about OS/2 is you can customize settings to the extreme. However, for the novice, it can be very overwhelming. So I'm just going to list those that are relevant and their associated settings. You will probably need to fine tune these for your system, since every system is different. But this will provide a good start for you. DOS_AUTOEXEC - The batch file you use to run Renegade. DOS_BACKGROUND_EXECUTION - On. DOS_BREAK - On. DOS_DEVICE - You want two items: <path to OS/2>\mdos\ansi.sys <path to SIO>\vx00.sys The former is the ANSI driver and the latter is the fossil emulator for Renegade. DOS_FILES - Set to atleast 40. DOS_HIGH - On. DOS_UMB - On. EMS_MEMORY_LIMIT - Set to 512 if you have memory to spare and you have Renegade set to use it's overlay in EMS. IDLE_SECONDS - This needs customized for your system. I suggest 30, but I have mine set to 60. If Renegade seems "jerky" and does not respond well, this may be too low. IDLE_SENSITIVITY - This too needs customized for your system. I suggest 50, which is what I use. If Renegade is not responding well, this may be too low. INT_DURING_IO - On. SESSION_PRIORITY - 32. If this causes the rest of your system to slow down noticably, set it to a lower value. SIO_Allow_Access_COMx - Turn on for the COM port Renegade will be using. Turn off for the COM ports it will not be. SIO_Idle_Sensitivity - This needs customized for your system. I suggest starting at 50 and start lowering it. If your ANSI screens start slowing down, it may be too low. I have mine at 30. VIDEO_FASTPASTE - On. This will help for pasting to Renegade from the clipboard. XMS_MEMORY_LIMIT - Set to atleast 1024. Use 2048 if you have memory to spare. This and EMS_MEMORY_LIMIT may need customized if you have door programs that like specific types of memory available. Now click on "save" to save the settings. Now click on the "General" tab on the right to bring up the "General" settings. You can now name your icon. If this will be the only Renegade node, you might want to just call it "Renegade". If it is going to be one of multiple nodes, call it "Renegade Node #1". If you are going to use multiple nodes, put a check mark in "template". Once it is a template you can drag copies off of it, like you did to create this, and it will have the exact same settings. You will only have to change the filenames, the name of the icon, and the DOS_AUTOEXEC setting. Now double click the upper left-hand corner of the settings window to close the window. If you want Renegade to start automatically upon bootup, locate your startup folder and drag and drop the Renegade icon into it. If You Use FileBar ------------------ The first thing you need to decide is what menu bar you will put Renegade in. I made a menu bar called "DOS Programs" for it and all other DOS programs I readily access. Now that you have decided, click on FileBar (left side) and choose "Edit Menus. Navigate to the menu you want to add Renegade to, and click "Add Item". (Please note that it is easier to navigate this configuration screen with a mouse than it is with the tab keys.) Give it a name, such as "Renegade", if you are only running one node, or "Renegade Node #1" if you running multinode. Renegade runs best in a full screen (but it will run windowed), so choose "DOS FS" under "Item Session Type". In "Pgm Path", put the complete path and filename to Renegade, or the batch file you use to run Renegade. Set "Directory" to the directory name of the batch file. In "Settings", type in the path name you put in "Pgm Path" followed by a filename with the extension .CFG, such as RG01.CFG. (Eg: "d:\renegade\rg01.cfg"). Click on "Settings" to bring up the DOS settings. Click on "Okay" to bring up all the settings. You should now see a very long list of DOS settings. One of the great things about OS/2 is you can customize settings to the extreme. However, for the novice, it can be very overwhelming. So I'm just going to list those that are relevant and their associated settings. You will probably need to fine tune these for your system, since every system is different. But this will provide a good start for you. DOS_AUTOEXEC - The batch file you use to run Renegade. DOS_BACKGROUND_EXECUTION - On. DOS_BREAK - On. DOS_DEVICE - You want two items: <path to OS/2>\mdos\ansi.sys <path to SIO>\vx00.sys The former is the ANSI driver and the latter is the fossil emulator for Renegade. DOS_FILES - Set to atleast 40. DOS_HIGH - On. DOS_UMB - On. EMS_MEMORY_LIMIT - Set to 512 if you have memory to spare and you have Renegade set to use it's overlay in EMS. IDLE_SECONDS - This needs customized for your system. I suggest 30, but I have mine set to 60. If Renegade seems "jerky" and does not respond well, this may be too low. IDLE_SENSITIVITY - This too needs customized for your system. I suggest 50, which is what I use. If Renegade is not responding well, this may be too low. INT_DURING_IO - On. SESSION_PRIORITY - 32. If this causes the rest of your system to slow down noticably, set it to a lower value. SIO_Allow_Access_COMx - Turn on for the COM port Renegade will be using. Turn off for the COM ports it will not be. SIO_Idle_Sensitivity - This needs customized for your system. I suggest starting at 50 and start lowering it. If your ANSI screens start slowing down, it may be too low. I have mine at 30. VIDEO_FASTPASTE - On. This will help for pasting to Renegade from the clipboard. XMS_MEMORY_LIMIT - Set to atleast 1024. Use 2048 if you have memory to spare. This and EMS_MEMORY_LIMIT may need customized if you have door programs that like specific types of memory available. Click on "Save" to save the settings. The settings are now saved in the file you set above in the "Settings" field. If you need to modify them at a later date, it may be easier just to edit that file with a text editor. You should now be back at the "Edit Item Data" screen. If you want this node of Renegade to start up automatically, I suggest putting a check mark in "Launch Item At Start". Now click on "Okay" to finish the settings. If you want to create a menu item for another node of Renegade, copy the item you just made (from the menu you are now at) and modify it to make all necessary changes. I suggest copying the configuration file (which you defined in the "Settings" field) that you specified for the previous node and use the copy for this new node so that you have a different .CFG file for every node. Creating a Telnet Node ---------------------- Making a Renegade node accessable via the InterNet through Telnet is extremely simple with OS/2 and SIO. Actually, SIO deserves most of the credit, because it comes with a program called VMODEM that does all the hard work. What VMODEM does is emulates a COM port over a Telnet connection. The only requirements are having an InterNet PPP connection and a "free" COM port in your SIO configuration. What I mean by a "free" COM port is that the unregistered version of SIO only supports four COM ports. You need to have SIO emulate another COM port, and this takes up one of the four ports SIO supports. To set SIO to emulate a COM port, add the following parameter to your SIO.SYS line in your CONFIG.SYS: (COMx,INTERNET:ADDRESS,NONE:IRQ) Where COMx is the COM port you want SIO to emulate, ADDRESS is the address you want SIO to emulate, and IRQ is the IRQ you want SIO to emulate. Example: (COM4,INTERNET:2E8,NONE:10) This will cause SIO to create a virtual COM4 that is available at address 2E8, IRQ 10. All you have to do is tell Renegade to access that COM port for that node, set the address and IRQ in the modem configuration, and you will be good to go! You can also run a mailer on this "virtual" COM port as well. Note that this COM port is *ALWAYS* locked at 57600. Configuring OS/2 to access the InterNet for a PPP connection is beyond the scope of this documentation. However, feel free to Netmail me if you need assistance with your configuration. Transfer Protocols ------------------ The "standard" transfer protocol that is used with Renegade is DSZ. DSZ is an excellent program - however it has one flaw. It was designed to run in a single task DOS environment. Under OS/2, DSZ is a CPU hog and it will make everything else crawl while someone is transferring a file. The only solution to this is to use another transfer protocol. Fortunately, the company that designed DSZ created another transfer protocol that works very well under OS/2 called FDSZ, which is designed to use a FOSSIL driver. It is a "prototype", but I have never had a problem with it. It can be FREQ from my system, magic name FDSZ. There are differences between FDSZ and DSZ. These include the F, D, handshake, and off commands, (The d (lower case) command is supported.) P, S, and Y parameters. The port command takes a number only. Otherwise, functionality is similar to DSZ.EXE. Here is my protocol configuration using FDSZ: XModem upload: fdsz %P rx %F XModem dnload: fdsz %P sx %F YModem upload: fdsz %P rb -k %F YModem dnload: fdsz %P sk -k %F ZModem upload: fdsz %P rz -m %F ZModem dnload: fdsz %P sz -m %F ZModem batchU: fdsz %P restrict rz -m ZModem batchD: fdsz %P -m @%D (note that it will appear as @D) FDSZ has minimal (virtually 0) CPU usage on my system. *Note* : Speaking only for myself, I use GSZ from Omen Technologies for my transfer protocols. While most people will tell you that GSZ is just a graphical version of DSZ, I've found that using it under OS/2 does not lag my system. There is one further advantage, GSZ uses the same commandlines that DSZ does. When I changed from DSZ to GSZ, all I did was rename GSZ.EXE to DSZ.COM. This saved me the time of having to manually edit all of my defined dsz protocols to say GSZ instead. -K. Reaverson Running OS/2 Programs --------------------- 32-bit OS/2 programs run significantly faster than their 16-bit DOS or 32-bit DOS counterparts. With this in mind, you may want to use an OS/2 program in conjunction with Renegade. But you are probably wondering "How can I do that when Renegade is a DOS program and OS/2 programs do not run from DOS sessions?" One option is to use a program by Hank Kelder called HSTART. HSTART can spawn OS/2 and DOS windows from OS/2 and DOS windows. You can obtain HSTART off of the InterNet at ftp://hobbes.nmsu.edu in /pub/os2/util/system/hstart05.zip. You can also FREQ it from my system as HSTART05.ZIP. HSTART comes with a utility called HWAIT which allows simple "signalling" between sessions. HWAIT can be used to send a signal to HSTART or to another HWAIT that is waiting for a signal. HWAIT can also be used to wait for a signal from another HWAIT. The signals can be named or unnamed. To use HSTART and HWAIT the most efficient way, place them in a directory in both your OS/2 path and DOS path. With that in mind, generally there are three ways HSTART is used in a DOS session: 1) To spawn an OS/2 application from a DOS session and the DOS session continues without pause. 2) To spawn an OS/2 application from a DOS session and pause the DOS session until an unnamed HWAIT signal is received from the spawned session. 3) To spawn an OS/2 application from a DOS session and pause the DOS session until a named HWAIT signal is received from the spawned session. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Therefore one may be preferred over another, depending upon the situation. Here are examples for each method: 1) Whenever Renegade exits and there is unsent mail, you want to automatically spawn an OS/2 session to run your OS/2 native mail processing sequence (such as CDRMAIL/2 and FastEcho/2). In this case, your batch file would have lines similar to this in it: <export mail sequence> hstart /FS c:\batch\scanmail.cmd <continue batch file> 2) You want to run the OS/2 version of a door program. In this case, you do not want the DOS session to continue until the OS/2 session is complete. You only one run node, so there is no possibility of another node running the same door and getting their signals crossed. Your batch file that Renegade calls would include a line similar to this: hstart /FS /WAIT c:\batch\lod.cmd The batch file "lod.cmd" would have: cd \doors\lod lod.exe <parameters> hwait exit 3) Same scenario as above, except you are running a multinode system. Your batch file that Renegade calls would include something similar to this: hstart /FS c:\batch\lod.cmd hwait /w:lod The batch file "lod.cmd" would have: cd \doors\lod lod.exe <parameters> hwait /s:lod exit For named signals for multinode systems, you might want to have Renegade pass the node # that is calling to the batch file, and have the node # as part of the name for the signal. Just remember you will also have to pass that node # to the batch file that is being called so that hwait can send the properly named signal. Please note that is easiest to have hstart spawn a batch file instead of the program directly, and that the path to the batch file is usually required. When HSTART spawns a session, it searches the root directory of your boot drive, and then the PATH, for the file it is spawning. It does not search the path HSTART is called from unless that path is in the PATH statement! For further details on HSTART and HWAIT, please refer to the documentation included in the distribution archive for HSTART. Written by Charles D. Gaefke (c) 1997, All Rights Reserved. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 25 - Renegade Under Windows95 ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Edit the dos properties of the batch file that runs the board to: -background suspend DISABLED -idle sensitivity to the lowest setting -allow screen saver DISABLED This is to keep win95 from declaring the board dead when it's not the window currently in focus. Then, edit the properties of a normal ms-dos session to: -background suspend ENABLED -idle sensitivity to the highest setting -screen saver ENABLED This is to keep any dos boxes you've got running in the background from slowing down the board too much when you're not actively using it. If you don't have a bajillion megs of ram, I'd suggest setting your desktop background to a plain colour instead of an image, because the image takes up a chunk o' memory. I wouldn't want to run rg multinode under win95 because rg single node is pretty damned slow already.. and this is on a p150 w/ 16 megs of ram, dedicated most of the time. Sad, eh? =) Also, whichever <or both> of the instances of intermail or what have was not the currently focused on window would get short shrift as far as resources go. Win95 doesn't offer any easy way to configure a dos session even to the extent that desqview does. Now, if you can live without the start button and that pesky explorer, you can speed things up a bit: open up the SYSTEM.INI file in your windows directory in a text editor. change the SHELL= line to say command.com instead of explorer.exe. (you can use the /k switch here if you like.. if you have anything you just can't live without in your startup folder now, you might want to make a batch file that runs 'em all and use the /k switch to run that batch file, because when using this shell, your startup folder will be ignored on startup.) What you will see when you next boot [after anything you specified with /k is done running first] is your usual desktop background, with no icons and no taskbar. Doubleclick on the background to bring up the task manager. From there I'd suggest selecting run from the file menu, and running "desktop", which will bring up a window with all your old desktop icons in it. What I did was make a shortcut to the c:\windows\Start Menu folder in my desktop folder so I could access all the programs that were formerly on the start menu relatively painlessly. You can navigate this shell using the familiar old short-cut keys: alt+tab to switch windows, alt+f4 to close a window, &c. &c. One irritating thing about this shell is that it's hard to find some system dialogues that you would normally access by right clicking on things, but you can get around this by choosing 'see help index' from the desktop window and searching for the subject you're looking for.. usually the help for that topic will have a nice polite hypertext link to the dialogue you want. This seems like a lot of trouble to go through, but it's worth it in that what you now have is a fast multitasker that runs dos and win95 programs, that is without the overhead and occasional bugs of explorer and the taskbar, and which, while obviously not as fast as a desqview setup would be on the same machine, will run a lot of programs, especially tossers, faster with win95's improvements on smartdrive. To run your board you should still use the modified properties you hypothetically set up way at the beginning of this message instead of just running your board from a normal dos box, because you'll still have the one major drawback of win95, the allocation of the lion's share of resources to the active window. in conclusion: use os/2 or desqview for less pain and more speed, but if you want to continue running win95 only programs (or just 16 bit win programs in native windows instead of an emu..) without having to reboot and use lilo or system commander or whatever, follow these steps to make it less painful for remote users, or even just to allow the board to run at all. Changing your shell to command.com is completely optional, but your users will thank you. Well, no they won't, users could find ways to complain about speed even if you were running on a dedicated p3000 system with 128 megs of ram, but it'll be faster, trust me. =) Don't even THINK about multinode unless you have MORE than 32 megs of ram and don't plan on using any other programs than the two instances of your mailer in the background. Written by Brooke Abbey <[email protected]> (c) 1997, All Rights Reserved. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 26 - Renegade Support ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── One of Renegade's many strong points has always been it's third party support. The authors can't shoulder the burden of helping out new sysops alone, otherwise they would never get any work done. :) Fortunetly, there are individuals willing to help out new guys and do their part to support the software. The following list is by no means comprehensive. If you're looking for help, and don't know where to find it, it is my hope this will give you a starting point. AUTHOR SUPPORT: The Courts of Chaos Sysop: Dr. Tachyon (Patrick Spence) Phone #: 602-241-1039 Fido Address: 1:114/252 Email: [email protected] The Pool Room Sysop: Slammin' (Gary Hall) Phone #: 219-447-5698 / 219-447-7205 Fido Address: 1:236/64 ECHOMAIL SUPPORT: FidoNet - RENEGADE: The Official Renegade Support Echo Moderators: Don Cranford (1:3634/37) Charles Bowman (1:3651/9.10) Patrick Spence (1:114/252) RENEGADE_BBS: The Original Renegade Support BBS Echo Moderator: Jeffrey J. Council (1:268/402) RENEGADE_UTILS: Renegade Utilities Moderator: Jeffrey J. Counsil (1:268/402) Renegade Support Net - Renegade Support Net is a Fido-compatible Network centered around Renegade support. With over 30 echomail bases that range from dealing directly with Renegade to subjects of interest to all sysops, RGSN is something worth looking into. Coordinator: Don Ludington (1:2215/118) - Fido (50:50/0) - RGSN INTERNET SUPPORT: World Wide Web - The Official Renegade Homepage http://www.egate.net/renegade Webmaster: Rob Williams <[email protected]> Renegade BBS Author's Web Site http://europa.humberc.on.ca/~tachyon/renegade Webmaster: Patrick Spence <[email protected]> The Official Renegade Suggestions Site http://dore.nomad2.ml.org/dore/renegade Webmaster: Tony Pascale <[email protected]> FTP - The Official Renegade FTP Site ftp://europa.humberc.on.ca/pub/renegade SiteOp: Rob Williams IRC - EFNet: #renegade Master ChannelOp: El_Diablo (Rob Williams) USENET - alt.bbs.renegade: This newsgroup has about as much spam as the rest, but there are some dedicated individuals that make an effort to answer any questions asked. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Chapter 27 - Dedicated to Craig ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} :):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):}:):} ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Glossary of Terms ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── ANSI - Short for American National Standards Institute, in BBS slang it's a format for saving files. The format was adopted by ANSI as it's standard, and the format acquired the name of the organization as a result. CTS/RTS - Short for Clear to Send/Request to Send, respectively. Also known as Hardware Flow Control. DOS - Short for Disk Operating System. Usually preceeded by a prefix of some sort. MS-DOS is Microsoft DOS, published by Microsoft, PC-DOS is IBM's commercial version of DOS. Local - From the SysOp's point of view, any system which is accessed by basically sitting down in front of it. Everything else is remote. The computer he runs his BBS off of is the Local Computer. The Local Computer's screen is the local display, anything typed on the Local Computer's keyboard is local input. Newbie - Slang for novice; sometimes used interchangeably with the word clueless. Sometimes used as a derogative, other times as friendly chiding (depends on the person saying it). In general, it denotes a person new to the hobby, and therefore not yet familiar with most of it's aspects. OS - Short for Operating System. OS/2 - Short for Operating System/2, a commercial operating system created by IBM. Remote - Not on the local computer; If a user sits down in front of their computer and dials into a BBS, they are the remote end of the connection; that users screen is the remote display, whatever that user types is remote input. RIP - Short for Random Imaging Protocol, this is an emulation that requires at least an EGA monitor. It never really caught on, but RIP was a 'pretty' emulation, artists drew in the format because it allows for clearer (and smaller) pictures than the other emulations. WFC Screen - WFC is short for Waiting For Caller. It's the blue screen with all the commands and stats that is seen when Renegade is first loaded. ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── Credits ───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────── The main parts of this manual were written by Theo Van Dinter ─ December 27, 1992 through January 2, 1993, and the other various dates that Renegade came out. Other parts were written by Cott Lang in the "Whatdone" file that is released with the new versions of Renegade. These docs were taken and HTML'ized by Carl Nasal. <[email protected]> Some chapters were written by third party individuals. They retain the copyright to their work, as noted at the end of the relevant chapters. All chapters are included with the permission of it's author. Version v98-101b Documentation was brought to you with aid from Ken Reaverson. Copyright (C) 1997,98 All Rights Reserved. Ken Reaverson (Adrian Blood) ─ SysOp: Shadowdale Running on a 5x86/133 w/16 Megs memory, 7.2 Gigs Online, Hayes Optima 33.6 ─ (770) 982─7859, Grayson, GA FidoNet (1:133/1004) / GuildeNet (88:340/0) Email: [email protected] *Maybe you're older, wiser in your right, it's your mistake* *I'm gonna do my own thing regardless, my choice to make*